cocoon


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cocoon

(kə-ko͞on′)
n.
a. A protective case of silk or similar fibrous material spun by the larvae of moths and certain other insects as a cover for the pupa.
b. A similar natural protective covering or structure, such as the egg case of a spider.
A descriptive term for the fibrotic encasement of the entire small intestine in sclerosing peritonitis, a spontaneous idiopathic process in young women, which follows peritoneovenous shunting, practolol therapy, peritoneal dialysis, chemotherapy, or in which other unknown toxins stimulate fibroblastic proliferation and reactive fibrosis
Treatment Surgical lysis of adhesions and constricting bands

cocoon

A descriptor for the fibrotic encasement of the entire small intestine in sclerosing peritonitis, a spontaneous idiopathic process in young ♀, which follows peritoneovenous shunting, practolol therapy, peritoneal dialysis, chemotherapy, where unknown toxins may stimulate fibroblastic proliferation, reactive fibrosis

cocoon

a protective covering of eggs or larvae found in several invertebrate groups. In some cases, e.g. ANNELIDS, a cocoon is produced by the adults to contain the eggs and in others, e.g. insects, by the larvae to protect the pupa during the course of development.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one of these groups (treatment group) we made a cut 5 mm long with scissors in the cocoon wall on the first day of observation (this cut was approximately of the same size as natural orifices made by spiderlings); in the other group (control), the cocoons remained closed.
Cocoon is powered by AI, which helps it avoid false alarms.
Researchers said finding evidence in favor of the cocoon model also increased the number of future detections of collisions between neutron stars, because astronomers won't need to rely on gravitations waves alone, but could electromagnetic waves too.
5 Chemical, physical and thermal analysis of silkworm cocoon (Bombyx mori), fibroin, chitosan nanofiber scaffolds and QS/FGS
These cocoons are made from a single filament of material secreted by the pupa and wrapped around itself for protection.
After taking cocoon weight cocoons were cut open and ten empty shells were weighed for each replication and treatment.
For a less manicured but equally enchanting snapshot of Sri Lankan life, the Cocoon Resort runs a guided bicycle tour of the villages around the hotel (PS17pp).
Octane's Cocoon cell therapy system integrates upstream and downstream processing including cell source isolation and cell expansion, cell collection, cell washing and final product formation, in a closed, single-use disposable cassette.
Abdominal cocoon was first observed by Owtschinnikow in 1907, who called it as peritonitis chronica fibrosa incapsulata at that time, first described and named by Singapore researchers Foo et al .
Cocoons may offer an untapped resource for finding soft and delicate cells, and even tiny organisms, researchers suggest July 15 in Biology Letters.