cochlear hair cell

cochlear hair cell

n.
A sensory cell in the spiral organ in synaptic contact with sensory as well as efferent fibers of the auditory nerve. Also called Corti's cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cochlear hair cell apoptosis (cell death), a key factor in several of the more common causes of acute hearing loss, is believed to be induced by molecular mechanisms most likely associated with p53-dependent stress response.
OPI is a development-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to developing and commercializing novel pharmacological solutions and approaches to treat hearing disorders, including acute sensorineural hearing loss due to noise or ototoxic drug exposure, tinnitus, and the restoration of hearing by regeneration of cochlear hair cells.
However, the new study finds that calcium is not required for adaptation in mammalian auditory hair cells and posits that one of the two previously described mechanisms is absent in auditory cochlear hair cells.
The cellular basis for aminoglycoside hearing loss is a destruction of cochlear hair cells, specifically the outer hair cells.
NF-kappaB pathway protects cochlear hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity.
The custom programs used for counting cochlear hair cells, plotting, and averaging cochleograms, were developed by R.
2+] damage to the arrangements of cochlear hair cells in the basal, middle, and apex turn in the organ of Corti from rats
Most cochlear hair cells have multiple auditory nerve fibers attached to them, and there is evidence for differences in the size of the synaptic endings of these neurons.
But repeated exposure to loud sounds can kill cochlear hair cells, resulting in permanent hearing loss
Last year, researchers reported that genetically engineered mice lacking Math 1 produced no cochlear hair cells, even in the embryonic stage.
Researchers theorize this resulted in a detrimental environment and loss of cochlear hair cells, leading to hearing loss in the mice.
There should be interesting research possibilities for applying nanotechnology to some particularly challenging otolaryngologic problems, such as restoration of cochlear hair cells, regeneration of acoustic or vestibular nerve fibers, treatment of tinnitus, and treatment of anosmia, among others.