cochineal

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coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl'), [C.I. 75470]
The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain. See: carmine.
Synonym(s): coccinella, coccus (2)
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]

cochineal

/coch·i·neal/ (koch´ĭ-nēl) dried female insects of Coccus cacti, enclosing young larvae; used as a coloring agent for pharmaceuticals and as a biological stain.

cochineal

[koch′inēl′]
Etymology: L, coccineus, bright red
a red dye prepared from the dried female insects of the species Coccus cacti containing young larvae. During the preparation of the dye the larvae are extracted with an aqueous solution of alum. The resulting dye has been used in coloring medicines.

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl)
[CI 75470] The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain.
See: carmine
Synonym(s): coccus (2) .
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Committee of Secrecy of the East India Company offered 2,000 [pounds sterling] to facilitate the project, and Anderson was asked to organize a nopalry, or Opuntia garden, at Madras, to provide cochineal insects with a ready-made habitat once they arrived from the Americas.
36) Despite his assumption that shipping cochineal insects to India would be easy, there were in fact several major practical obstacles.
In 1787, Banks requested that the First Fleet, bound for Botany Bay, call at Rio de Janeiro to acquire both Opuntia cacti and wild cochineal insects for transplantation to Australia.
In order for the cochineal insects to survive their journey and thrive after arrival, Banks assumed that Opuntia specimens also had to be shipped to India.
James Anderson was experimenting with Opuntia as a source of food and as a cure for scurvy in 1792 because no cochineal insects had reached India yet.
Significantly, the timing of the Contractor's voyage enabled it to avoid heavy storms and rains; perhaps even more important, the cochineal insects reached Bengal before completing a full life cycle.
In their instructions to the Government of Madras regarding cochineal, the Commercial Department in London predicted that a large number of cochineal insects would die en route to India, but they were confident that enough would survive to form successful colonies; still, on the whole, they underestimated how difficult it would be to transplant parasitic insects, dependent on a specific species of cactus, by sea.
By the time James Anderson received his own supply of cochineal insects, sent by Captain Neilson during the spring, he had become aware that Opuntia was also prevalent in southern India, where it was cultivated as a hedge plant called Naga kalli.
Cochineal insects ultimately reached India, but an interval of several years separated the inception of the transplantation scheme and its implementation.