cochineal

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coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl'), [C.I. 75470]
The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain. See: carmine.
Synonym(s): coccinella, coccus (2)
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]

cochineal

/coch·i·neal/ (koch´ĭ-nēl) dried female insects of Coccus cacti, enclosing young larvae; used as a coloring agent for pharmaceuticals and as a biological stain.

cochineal

[koch′inēl′]
Etymology: L, coccineus, bright red
a red dye prepared from the dried female insects of the species Coccus cacti containing young larvae. During the preparation of the dye the larvae are extracted with an aqueous solution of alum. The resulting dye has been used in coloring medicines.

coch·i·neal

(kotch'i-nēl)
[CI 75470] The dried female insects, Coccus cacti, enclosing the young larvae, or the dried female insect, Dactylopius coccus, containing eggs and larvae, from which coccinellin is obtained; used as a red coloring agent and a stain.
See: carmine
Synonym(s): coccus (2) .
[O.Sp. cochinilla, wood louse, fr. G. kokkinos, berry]
References in periodicals archive ?
As far as cochineal red goes, it was extracted from the female cochineal insect that infests certain species of cactus.
Cochineal insects were one of 52 insect species brought to Australia early this century as potential prickly pear combatants.
It is also a homage to the island's industrial heritage of dye production, whereby cochineal insects would feed on cacti before being harvested for their rich crimson blood.
1) Nikiforuk makes a simple entomological error here: several pages are devoted to cochineal insects as if they were beetles; they are, in fact, scale insects, close relatives of aphids.
Companies from Wuhan (China) to Tarrytown (New York) were offering bright natural colorings made from red cabbage, purple sweet potatoes, grape skins, black carrots, beet roots, cochineal insects, and (not yet allowed in American foods) blue gardenias.