cocarcinogen


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Related to cocarcinogen: carcinogen

cocarcinogen

 [ko″kahr-sin´o-jen]
an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō-kar-sin'ō-jen'),
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.

cocarcinogen

/co·car·cin·o·gen/ (ko″kahr-sin´o-jen) promoter (3).

cocarcinogen

(kō′kär-sĭn′ə-jən, kō-kär′sĭn-ə-jĕn′)
n.
A substance or factor that will not promote cancer by itself but can potentiate cancer when acting with carcinogenic agents.

co·car′cin·o·gen′ic (-sə-nə-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

cocarcinogen

[kōkär′sənəjən]
Etymology: L, cum, together with; Gk, karkinos, crab, genein, to produce
an agent that alone does not transform a normal cell into a cancerous state but in concert with another agent can effect the transformation.

co·car·cin·o·gen

(kō'kahr-sin'ō-jen)
A substance that works symbiotically with a carcinogen in the production of cancer.

cocarcinogen

an agent that increases the effect of a carcinogen by direct concurrent local effect on the tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, despite a variety of methodologic concerns, there is moderate to strong evidence to suggest that SV40 is a potential human cocarcinogen (see Table 2).
Crocidolite asbestos and SV40 are cocarcinogens in human mesothelial cells and in causing mesothelioma in hamsters.
Apparently, asbestos plays a cocarcinogen role in lung cancer, with promoter-like activity and synergism with smoking, whereas in mesothelioma it acts as a complete carcinogen.
Dietary catechol (CAT), a constituent of cigarette smoke, was previously found to be a cocarcinogen with methyl-N-nitrosamine for inducing esophageal tumors in rats.
1] acts in synergy with a cocarcinogen that forms part of the etiology of EC.
Exposures associated with arsenic due to cooking and agricultural activities (including herbicide and pesticide use) should be explored, along with the identification and control of other carcinogenic compounds that may act as cocarcinogens.