coca


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Related to coca: Coca plant, Erythroxylum coca

co·ca

(kō'kă),
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; the source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]

coca

a species of South American shrubs native to Bolivia and Peru and cultivated in Indonesia. The leaves are dried and then chewed for their stimulant effect by some of the people of the region. It is a natural source of cocaine.

co·ca

(kō'kă)
The dried leaves of Erythroxylon coca, yielding not less than 0.5% of ether-soluble alkaloids; source of cocaine and several other alkaloids.
[S. Am.]

coca,

n Latin name:
Erythroxylum spp.; part used: leaves; uses: quicken activity of the physiologic process, astringent, anesthetic, relieve hunger, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, stomach pains; stimulate central nervous system; stimulate muscular activity; relieve neurasthenia, dilate pupils; paralyze sensory nerve fibers; pre-cautions: addictive, hallucinations and delusions, can cause restlessness, tremors; convulsions, emaciation, memory loss, sleeplessness, severe agitation, tachycardia, perspiration, elevated blood pressure. Also called
cuca and
cocaine.

coca

see cocaine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone said the guerrillas and coca will never be stopped by military force but only through massive financial aid to address social and economic inequities.
In Peru and Bolivia, we will work with those governments to continue their reductions in coca through a combination of eradication, interdiction, and alternative development.
Programs to provide humanitarian relief for displaced persons, to help small farmers and low-level coca workers find legitimate alternatives to the drug trade, and to strengthen governance, the rule of law, and human rights will also be incorporated into the ACI.
Weill, who's studied coca for more than 25 years, said that in the early 1980's, Peruvian coca tea was widely available through mail-order catalogs and health-food stores.
Weill says that while tea is only the mildest and most innocuous coca product, "I'd like to see some stronger extracts of the leaf become available for prescription for stomach disorders, motion sickness, and possibly diabetes.
In his 1993 best-selling book "For God, Country, and Coca-Cola," author Mark Pendergrast points out that native Peruvians and Bolivians have chewed coca leaves and drunk coca tea for more than 2,000 years, with no ill effects.
In the early 20th century, coca leaves constituted Peru's biggest export; nearly 5,200 metric tons were shipped between 1900 and 1905.
Concludes Siegel, "The history of coca and cocaine [use] has been a history of increasing doses, increasingly effective routes of administration and an increasing incidence of dependence and toxicity.
The United States must allow these poor Andean countries to undergo a gradual eradication program while introducing alternative crops with tariff-free status, adequate infrastructure to get products to market and subsidies not to grow coca.
Offer Andean farmers a real alternative and they will happily get out of the coca game.