coat


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Related to coat: coast, buffy coat, jacket, shirt, sweater, CAOT

coat

 [kōt]
1. a membrane or other structure covering or lining a part or organ; in anatomic nomenclature called tunica.
2. the layer or layers of protective protein surrounding the nucleic acid in a virus. See also capsid.
buffy coat the thin yellowish layer of leukocytes overlying the packed erythrocytes in centrifuged blood.

coat

(kōt),
1. The outer covering or envelope of an organ or part.
2. One of the layers of membranous or other tissues forming the wall of a canal or hollow organ.

coat

(kōt)
1. tunica; a membrane or other tissue covering or lining an organ or part.
2. the layer(s) of protective protein surrounding the nucleic acid in a virus.

buffy coat  the thin yellowish layer of leukocytes overlying the packed erythrocytes in centrifuged blood.

coat

(kōt)
n.
A natural outer covering, such as the fur of an animal or the enveloping layer of an organ.

coat′ed adj.

coat

Etymology: ME, cote
1 a membrane that covers the outside of an organ or part.
2 one of the layers of a wall of an organ or part, especially a canal or a vessel.

coat

(kōt)
1. The outer covering or envelope of an organ or part.
2. One of the layers of membranous or other tissues forming the wall of a canal or hollow organ.
See: tunic

coat

(kōt)
1. The outer covering or envelope of an organ or part.
2. One of the layers of membranous or other tissues forming the wall of a canal.

coat

1. haircoat—the overall coating of hair on all our species of domestic animals.
2. a membrane or other tissue covering or lining an organ; in anatomic nomenclature called also tunica.

bristle coat
(1) in dogs, a short, stiff wire-haired coat.
broken coat
(1) in dogs, a harsh, wiry outer layer with a softer undercoat.
brush coat
(1) a short, straight stiff coat.
corded coat
(1) in dogs, a coat that forms ringlets or dreadlocks. Seen in Komondors and Pulis.
coat licking (1)
excessive self-grooming in farm animals, commonly a manifestation of nutritional deficiency, e.g. salt deficiency.
References in classic literature ?
Well," I says, "Jim's right, anyway, when he says he ain't got no coat of arms, because he hain't.
WHEN Peter got home, his mother forgave him, because she was so glad to see that he had found his shoes and coat.
The snow drifted under my great-coat, under my coat, under my cravat, and melted there.
There, too, was the bridegroom, dressed in a fine purple coat and gold- lace waistcoat, with as much other finery as the Puritan laws and customs would allow him to put on.
You dragged at my brown coat so that it is all torn and full of holes, you clumsy creatures
His hand was under the coat for but a moment, yet those quick, deft fingers had felt of each coin, and found and discarded the fatal piece.
Nikita called out, well knowing how carefully Mukhorty threw out his hind leg just to touch his greasy sheepskin coat but not to strike him--a trick Nikita much appreciated.
Several had their coats off and their shirt sleeves rolled up.
The prince hath other things to think upon," quoth Sir William de Pakington; "but if you be a Mackworth you must be a Mackworth of Normanton, and indeed I see now that your coat is sable and ermine.
Passing a cornfield the other day, close by a hat and coat on a stake, I recognized the owner of the farm.
He seemed to have just scrambled out of a dust-bin in a tam-o'shanter cap and a tattered soldier's coat much too long for him.
Geppetto makes Pinocchio a new pair of feet, and sells his coat to buy him an A-B-C book