coarse

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coarse

(kors) not fine; not microscopic.

coarse

[kôrs]
Etymology: ME, cors, common
(in physiology) involving a wide range of movements, such as those associated with tremors and other involuntary motions of the skeletal muscle.
References in classic literature ?
Elizabeth was shocked to think that, however incapable of such coarseness of EXPRESSION herself, the coarseness of the SENTIMENT was little other than her own breast had harboured and fancied liberal!
Athos and Aramis suppressed as well as they could the disgust they felt in the presence of such coarseness and brutality.
Edward could not have shown himself more practical, though he might have evinced more coarseness and urgency; and then she had so many reasons, so many explanations; and, after all, she succeeded in proving herself quite disinterested and even liberal.
It seemed, in fact, a new development of the love of the beautiful, such as might have made him a poet, a painter, or a sculptor, and which was as completely refined from all utilitarian coarseness as it could have been in either of the fine arts.
Her manners were open, easy, and decided, like one who had no distrust of herself, and no doubts of what to do; without any approach to coarseness, however, or any want of good humour.
There was something subtly wrong with the face, some coarseness of expression, some hardness, perhaps, of eye, some looseness of lip which marred its perfect beauty.
There is such a thing as the coarseness of a gentleman.
He described the impression that Rembrandt made on him with a coarseness I cannot repeat.
But he seemed to revel in the coarseness of her language and would often report some phrase which reeked of the gutter.
I may have been to blame, I admit it; but nothing excuses violence of language and coarseness of expression, especially in a man who has been carefully brought up, as I know Harris has been.
Then he recalled the coarseness and bluntness of her thoughts and the vulgarity of the expressions that were natural to her, though she had been brought up in the most aristocratic circles.
Hilbery was depressed without visible cause, unless a certain crudeness verging upon coarseness in the temper of her favorite Elizabethans could be held responsible for the mood.