coarse


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to coarse: course, Coarse Crackles

coarse

(kors) not fine; not microscopic.

coarse

[kôrs]
Etymology: ME, cors, common
(in physiology) involving a wide range of movements, such as those associated with tremors and other involuntary motions of the skeletal muscle.
References in classic literature ?
There were no beds given the slaves, unless one coarse blanket be considered such, and none but the men and women had these.
The lad muttered something to himself and drummed on the window-pane with his coarse fingers.
Its legs were quite as long as the tiger had said, and its body covered with coarse black hair.
Why it was that upon this beautiful feminine tissue, sensitive as gossamer, and practically blank as snow as yet, there should have been traced such a coarse pattern as it was doomed to receive; why so often the coarse appropriates the finer thus, the wrong man the woman, the wrong woman the man, many thousand years of analytical philosophy have failed to explain to our sense of order.
There was a real distaste in his face, and yet it was the face of a coarse and sensual man.
The coarse evergreen color of the small fir trees scattered here and there among the birches was an unpleasant reminder of winter.
Nothing but coarse gold for you-all, that's your way, not getting half of it out of the ground and losing into the tailings half of what you-all do get.
Instead of answering, he burst into a fit of laughter--loud, coarse, hard laughter, so utterly unlike any sound I had ever yet heard issue from his lips, so strangely and shockingly foreign to his character as
There are, we may be glad, few coarse lines in Spenser, but he is artificial.
Beside it is written, in very rough and coarse characters, 'The sign of the four,--Jonathan Small, Mahomet Singh, Abdullah Khan, Dost Akbar.
No, he was not; for, on the opposite side of the fire, there sat with folded arms a wrinkled hideous figure, with deeply sunk and bloodshot eyes, and an immensely long cadaverous face, shadowed by jagged and matted locks of coarse black hair.
But unity both of material and of atmosphere suffers not only from the diversity among the separate plays but also from the violent intrusion of the comedy and the farce which the coarse taste of the audience demanded.