coalesce


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coalesce

[kō′əles′]
Etymology: L, coalescere, to grow together
1 to grow together.
2 to unite.

coalesce

(kō-ăl-ĕs′) [L. coalescere]
To fuse; to run or grow together.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, IT buyers should begin to see greater clarity in their choices, as Web services development platforms coalesce around suppliers such as IBM, Microsoft, and Sun.
The city tumbles down the steep slopes to the river's edge where it coalesces into a raffish assortment of bars, cafes and restaurants housed in tottering waterfront terraces.
In new plantings on untrafficked beds in irrigated orchards, freshly tilled soil of high water stability coalesces by a progressive welding at points of contact between fragments and between aggregates.
This reference coalesces current and essential information about both tradename and generic chemical additives into a single source and expedites material selection for the function/applications, CAS number and EINECS number.
Unless withdrawn, they never die; instead, they lie dormant--until a critical mass of applications from two-thirds (34) of the states coalesces into a mandate to Congress to call a convention.
Unlike the representation of Egypt, the image of Iraq in Chalet Lost History never coalesces into architectural motifs and manufactured bric-a-brac, let alone into debased versions of them.
In clear language, de Villiers describes how wind forms, what forces affect the movement of air masses, and how air coalesces into vortexes, including tornadoes and hurricanes.
An army of bubbles coalesces at the center of one, then radoates Out in a scattershor pattern.
But the dance never really coalesces, building neither momentum nor strong atmosphere.
In the standard recipe for making such a massive planet, a solid core about 10 times the mass of Earth coalesces from this protoplanetary disk.