coal tar creosote

coal tar creosote

creosote obtained by high temperature carbonization of bituminous coal. It is a brown-to-black, oily liquid, a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons, tar acids, and tar bases, mainly used as a wood preservative. It is toxic to humans and other animals by contact, ingestion, or inhalation, and coal tar is a human carcinogen. Animals may suffer skin irritation from recently treated wood or ulceration of the esophagus if they chew on it.

coal tar creosote

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There have been limited subsequent case reports linking coal tar creosote with squamous cell cancers (Cookson 1924; Lenson 1956; Shimauchi et al.
The term "creosote" is often used to describe these PAH-rich products of combustion and their distillates, and encompasses such products as wood creosote (from the combustion of beech and other woods), coal tar creosote (from the combustion of coal or coal tar), and coal tar pitch volatiles.
Coal tar creosote (containing over 300 different compounds, the majority of which are PAHs such as phenols, cresols, xylenols, pyridines, and benzene) is the most commonly used wood preservative in the United States [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) 2002].
Occupational exposures to coal tar creosote are usually associated with work in wood preservation/pressure treatment facilities, fence building, bridge construction, utility work (telephone poles), aluminum smelting, and creosote site remediation.
Non-cancer effects of coal tar creosote exposure involve primarily dermal and mucosal irritation manifested by dermatoses, photosensitivities, rhinitis, and conjunctivitis.
However, the chemical often used to preserve the wood, coal tar creosote, can present some problems.
Coal tar creosote can also negatively affect the environment.
From the end of this month, the general public are not able to use wood preservatives that contain creosote or coal tar creosote.
After allowing the samples to air-dry, they were dual treated with coal-tar creosote meeting AWPA standard P1/P13-91, Standard for Coal Tar Creosote for Land and Fresh Water and Marine (Coastal Water) Use, [5] using a full-cell treatment schedule.
Some pyrolytic products containing PAHs in appreciable concentrations are coal tars, coal tar creosote, anthracene soils, coal tar pitch, used crankcase lubricants, coal gasification oils and tars, automotive tires, certain asphalts, and carbon black.
Comparison of a coal tar creosote, a petroleum containing pentachlorophenol, or copper naphthenate and mixture of them.
In: Book of Standards; A6-97, Method for the determination of oil-type preservatives and water in wood; E7-93, Standard method of evaluating wood preservatives by field tests with stakes; M2-97, Standard for inspection of wood products treated with preservatives; P1/P13-95, Standard for coal tar creosote for land, fresh water, and marine (coastal water) use.