coach


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coach

(kōch)
To provide suggestions, feedback, direction, training, and redirection to another person or to a group or team to improve the ability to perform a task well.
2. One who provides such suggestions, feedback, direction, or training.

health coach

One who educates, encourages, and motivates another to achieve improved fitness or wellness.
References in classic literature ?
The stillness consequent on the cessation of the rumbling and and labouring of the coach, added to the stillness of the night, made it very quiet indeed.
The night was not so pleasant as the evening, for it got chilly; and being put between two gentlemen (the rough-faced one and another) to prevent my tumbling off the coach, I was nearly smothered by their falling asleep, and completely blocking me up.
Benedict following our road, nor do we know whether or not there are any captive princesses coming in this coach.
The crazy coach rocked on its great leather springs, and swayed like a boat tossed on a stormy sea.
Bullfrog alive, nor, though I looked very sharply about the coach, could I detect any traces of that beloved woman's dead body.
And Dunyasha, with clenched teeth, without replying but with an aggrieved look on her face, hastily got into the coach to rearrange the seat.
He wanted to run after the coach which was carrying away Cornelius with his bulbs.
The coach drove up, and the reverend gentleman (after waiting characteristically for the woman's ladder) mounted to his place on the roof, behind the coachman.
Having too much money and nothing at all to do with it, they were paying a hackney coach as I came up, sir.
In a few minutes, a lovely little coach, made of glass, with lining as soft as whipped cream and chocolate pudding, and stuffed with canary feathers, pulled out of the stable.
Mr Maclachlan immediately closed with the proposal of the coachman, and, at the same time, persuaded his friend Fitzpatrick to accept of the fourth place in the coach.
Tom and his father arrived in town from Berkshire the day before, and finding, on inquiry, that the Birmingham coaches which ran from the city did not pass through Rugby, but deposited their passengers at Dunchurch, a village three miles distant on the main road, where said passengers had to wait for the Oxford and Leicester coach in the evening, or to take a post-chaise, had resolved that Tom should travel down by the Tally-ho, which diverged from the main road and passed through Rugby itself.