co-payment


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co-payment

Managed Care That portion of a claim or medical expense that a health plan member must pay out-of-pocket for specific medical services–eg, hospital care, drugs, office visits, etc; the insurer pays the remaining portion

co-payment

, co-pay (ko?pa'ment) (ko'pa')
The fee insured persons must pay, in addition to their health insurance premiums and deductibles, for specific medical services such as emergency department visits, appointments with primary care providers, laboratory studies, prescriptions, or x-ray examinations.
See: coinsurance
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though his premium will drop 10 percent, the sergeant guaranteed he would pay for it "on the back end'' with the higher co-payments, medical costs and prescriptions.
Even the AMA and other health groups are against the co-payment because it would prevent Aussies from visiting their GPs and could lead to a spike in emergency admissions.
According to the consulting firm Amundsen Group, the pharmaceutical industry spent about $4 billion on co-payment assistance to patients in private health plans in 2011, the most recent year for which data is available.
The emergency room co-payment could range from $150 at a platinum plan to $250 per year at a bronze plan.
Our records indicate you have paid a co-payment for care covered by this law after May 5, 2010, and that you are due a refund.
When Medicare managed care plans raise outpatient co-payments, they experience fewer outpatient visits but also more hospitalizations and longer inpatient stays, especially among chronically ill beneficiaries and those living in areas of poverty, a study showed.
Practically everything in life is a form of co-payment.
He suggested that implementing a co-payment would help inmates with doing just that.
Adding up payroll deductions for premiums of both plans, plus co-payments, deductibles and tax advantages, he computed saving about $700 annually.
The network of dentists accepts payment from union insurance plans for services rendered as payment in full with certain procedures requiring a small out-of- pocket co-payment from the union member patient.
However, traditional clients will likely find Scenario A's $418,000 co-payment to be unaffordable.
Workers whose employers switch from flat co-payment drug plans to so-called "tiered" systems are more likely to start using less expensive drugs but also to stop taking their prescriptions entirely, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.