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poison

 [poi´zun]
a substance that, on ingestion, inhalation, absorption, application, injection, or development within the body, in relatively small amounts, may cause structural or functional disturbance. Called also toxin and venom. adj., adj poisonous.

Corrosives are poisons that destroy tissues directly. They include the mineral acids, such as nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrochloric acid; the caustic alkalis, such as ammonia, sodium hydroxide (lye), sodium carbonate, and sodium hypochlorite; and carbolic acid (phenol). Irritants are poisons that inflame the mucous membranes by direct action. These include arsenic, copper sulfate, salts of lead, zinc, and phosphorus, and many others. neurotoxins or nerve toxins act on the nerves or affect some of the basic cell processes. This large group includes the narcotics, such as opium, heroin, and cocaine, and the barbiturates, anesthetics, and alcohols. hemotoxins or blood toxins act on the blood and deprive it of oxygen. They include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrocyanic acid, and the gases used in chemical warfare. Some blood toxins destroy the blood cells or the platelets. See also poisoning and names of individual poisons.
poison ivy, oak, and sumac common plants of the genus Rhus that cause allergic skin reactions. The poison contained in their leaves, roots, and berries is an oily substance called urushiol. It has no effect on some people; in others, momentary or even indirect contact may cause itching and even painful rashes, blisters, and swelling; see Rhusdermatitis.
Poison Ivy. Poison ivy (Rhus radicans) grows in the form of climbing vines, shrubs that trail on the ground, and shrubbery that grows upright without any support. The vine clings to stone and brick houses and climbs trees and poles. It flourishes abundantly along fences, paths, and roadways, and is often partly hidden by other foliage.
Recognition. The poison ivy plant is attractive and is often picked as a decoration by unsuspecting flower gatherers. Although poison ivy comes in many forms and displays seasonal changes, it has one constant characteristic: The leaves always grow in clusters of three, one at the end of the stalk, the other two opposite one another.
Transmission. The plant is particularly potent in the spring and early summer when it is full of oily resinous sap. This forms an invisible film upon the human skin on contact. Direct contact is not always necessary. Some cases of poison ivy dermatitis are caused by the handling of clothing or garden implements that have been contaminated by the sap, sometimes months earlier; dogs and cats may carry it on their fur. Many people are so sensitive that smoke from a brush fire containing poison ivy brings on a rash.
Symptoms. After exposure, the symptoms of poison ivy dermatitis may develop in a matter of hours, though sometimes they do not appear for several days. There is reddening on the hands, neck, face, legs, or whatever parts of the body have been exposed, with considerable itching. Small blisters form which later become larger and eventually exude a watery fluid. The skin then becomes crusty and dry. After a few weeks all symptoms spontaneously disappear.
Treatment. An attack of poison ivy dermatitis can sometimes be avoided if the skin is washed immediately after contact. The skin should be lathered several times and rinsed each time in running water. This may remove all or at least part of the poison ivy film before it is able to penetrate the skin. If, despite precautions, dermatitis does develop, various treatments may relieve the itching. An old standard remedy is calamine lotion. If the inflammation becomes unusually severe or is accompanied by fever, a health care provider should be consulted. A cortisone preparation may be prescribed, which can be taken orally, injected, or applied locally as a cream.
Poison Oak. Poison oak (Rhus diversiloba or R. toxicodendron), sometimes known as oakleaf ivy, is related to poison ivy and not to the oak tree; its eastern and western varieties resemble each other closely. It is usually a low-growing shrub and seldom a climbing vine. It has three leaves, like poison ivy, but they are lobed and bear a slight resemblance to small oak leaves. Its berries are white and small, like those of poison ivy. Poison oak causes the same symptoms as poison ivy. Prevention and treatment are the same as for poison ivy.
Poison Sumac. Although poison sumac (Rhus vernix) goes by other names, such as swamp sumac, poison elder, poison ash, poison dogwood, and thunderwood, there is only one variety of it. Sometimes, however, poison sumac is confused with the several harmless kinds of sumac. Poison sumac is a coarse woody shrub or small tree, and it has white berries, distinguishing it from the harmless varieties of sumac, which have red berries. Symptoms and treatment are the same as for poison ivy.
poison center (poison control center) a telephone service with toxicology experts providing emergency treatment advice for all kinds of poisonings, 24 hours a day. Poison control centers also provide poison prevention information to the community and education about recognition and treatment of poison exposures for health care providers. By gathering data about the outcomes of poison exposures, they also identify new or unexpected toxic hazards, allowing for product recalls, reformulations, or repackaging. Their staffs include physicians, nurses, and pharmacists with training in toxicology. There are more than 500 poison control centers in the United States; 65 of them are officially certified and are members of the American Association of Poison Control Centers. All of these provide 24-hour service and can be reached by calling 1-800-222-1222. See the Appendix of Poison Control Centers, which lists the certified ones.

poi·son

(poy'zŏn),
1. Any substance, either taken internally or applied externally, injurious to health or dangerous to life.
2. A substance that inhibits a chemical reaction or inactivates a catalyst.
[Fr., fr. L. potio, potion, draught]

poison

/poi·son/ (poiz´'n) a substance that, on ingestion, inhalation, absorption, application, injection, or development within the body, in relatively small amounts, may cause structural damage or functional disturbance.poi´sonous

poison

(poi′zən)
n.
1. A substance that causes injury, illness, or death, especially by chemical means.
2. Something destructive or fatal.
3. Chemistry A substance that inhibits another substance or a reaction: a catalyst poison.
tr.v. poi·soned, poi·soning, poi·sons
1. To kill or harm with poison.
2. To put poison on or into: poisoning arrows; poisoned the drink.
3. Chemistry & Physics To inhibit (a substance or reaction).
adj.
Poisonous.

poi′son·er n.

poison

[poi′zən]
Etymology: L, potio, drink
any substance that impairs health or destroys life when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed by the body in relatively small amounts. Some toxicologists suggest that, depending on the dose, all substances are poisons. Many experts state that it is impossible to categorize any chemical as either safe or toxic and that the real concern is the risk or hazard associated with the use of any substance. Clinically all poisons are divided into those that respond to specific treatments or antidotes and those for which there is no specific treatment. Research continues to develop effective antitoxins for poisons, but there are relatively few effective antidotes. Maintaining respiration and circulation is the most important aspect of treatment. See also poisoning treatment. poisonous, adj.
Drug slang A regional street term for heroin, fentanyl
Oncology A popular term for any cytotoxic drug used to manage cancer
Toxicology A toxic substance that adversely affects the metabolism of a cell, tissue or entire organism, evoking biochemical and histologic changes, and possibly evoking irreversible cell damage and/or death
Management
Haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis Sedative-hypnotics (chloral hydrate, ethanol, ethylene glycol, methanol, barbiturates, meprobamate, analgesics), acetaminophen, aspirin, phenacetin, amphetamines, heavy metals (arsenic, lead, mercury) metallic salts (e.g., of calcium or lithium) halides, alkaloids (quinine, strychnine, anilines, carbon tetrachloride, ergotamine, INH, nitrofurantoin, phenytoin, theophylline)
Nondialysis poisons Amitriptyline, anticholinergics, antidepressants, atropine, benzodiazepines, digitalis, hallucinogens, heroin, methaqualone, phenelzine, phenothiazines, propoxyphene

poison

Drug slang A regional street term for heroin; fentanyl Toxicology A toxic substance that adversely affects the metabolism of a cell, tissue or entire organism, evoking biochemical and histologic changes, and possibly evoke irreversible cell damage and/or death Management–dialysis Sedative-hypnotics–chloral hydrate, ethanol, ethylene glycol, methanol, barbiturates, meprobamate, analgesics–acetaminophen, aspirin, phenacetin, amphetamines, heavy metals–arsenic, lead, mercury, metallic salts–eg, of calcium or lithium, halides, alkaloids–quinine, strychnine, anilines, carbon tetrachloride, ergotamine, INH, nitrofurantoin, phenytoin, theophylline Nondialysis poisons  Amitriptyline, anticholinergics, antidepressants, atropine, benzodiazepines, digitalis, hallucinogens, heroin, methaqualone, phenelzine, phenothiazines, propoxyphene
Poison potency–MLD–minimum lethal dose  
Agent  MLD, mole/kg
Botulinum toxin A  3.3 x 10-17
Tetanus toxin 1.0 x 10-15
Diphtheria toxin 4.2 x 10-12
Agent Orange  3.1 x 10-9
Curare 7.2 x 10-7
Strychnine 1.5 x 10-6
Cyanide  2.0 x 10-4 

poi·son

(poy'zŏn)
Any substance, either taken internally or applied externally, which is injurious to health or dangerous to life.
See also: toxicant, intoxicant
[Fr., fr. L. potio, potion, draught]

poison

Any substance capable, in small amounts, of damaging the structure or function of living organisms or of causing their death. The virulence of a poison is assessed by the smallness of the dose required to produce its effect and by the severity of the effect. Many of the most poisonous substances act by interfering with fundamental cell enzyme systems. Bacterial toxins are amongst the most poisonous substances known.

poi·son

(poy'zŏn)
Any substance, either taken internally or applied externally, injurious to health or dangerous to life.
[Fr., fr. L. potio, potion, draught]

poison,

n a substance that, when ingested, inhaled, absorbed, injected into, or developed within the body, will cause damage to structures of the body and impair or destroy their function.

poison

a substance that, on ingestion, inhalation, absorption, application, injection or development within the body, in relatively small amounts, may cause structural damage or functional disturbance.
Corrosives are poisons that destroy tissues directly. They include the mineral acids, such as nitric acid, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid, and the caustic alkalis, such as ammonia, sodium hydroxide (lye), sodium carbonate and sodium hypochlorite; and carbolic acid (phenol).
Irritants are poisons that inflame the mucous membranes by direct action. These include copper sulfate, salts of lead, cantharidin, oxalate raphides, and many plant and insect poisons.
Nerve toxins act on the nerves or affect some of the basic cell processes. This large group includes the narcotics, such as opium, heroin and cocaine, and the barbiturates, anesthetics and alcohols.
Blood toxins act on the blood and deprive it of oxygen. They include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrocyanic acid and the gases used in chemical warfare. Some blood toxins destroy the blood cells or the platelets.
See also poisoning and names of individual poisons.

poison bean
sesbania spp., thermopsismontana.
berry poison
gastrolobiumparvifolium.
box poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
bullock poison
gastrolobiumtrilobum.
poison bush
thesiumnamaquense.
bushman's poison
poison buttercup
ranunculusscleratus.
camel poison
erythrophleumchlorostachys.
candyup poison
stypandra glauca.
Champion Bay poison
gastrolobiumoxyloboides.
clover-leaf poison
goodialotifolia.
cluster poison
gastrolobiumbennettsianum.
poison Control Center
public facility set up to provide information around the clock to provide information on toxicity of substances and current information of correct first aid methods and antidotes for poisoning emergencies.
crinkle-leaf poison
gastrolobiumvillosum.
desert poison bush
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
poison elder
Gilbernene poison
gastrolobiumrotundifolium.
granite poison
gastrolobiumgraniticum.
heart-leaf poison bush
gastrolobiumbilobum or G. grandiflorum.
poison hemlock
Hill River poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
hook-point poison
gastrolobiumhamulosum.
horned poison
gastrolobiumpolystachyum.
Hutt River poison
gastrolobiumpropinquum.
insect poison
poison ivy
toxicodendronradicans.
kite-leaf poison
gastrolobiumlaytonii.
lamb poison
isotropiscuneifolia.
poison leaf
dichapetalumcymosum.
poison lobelia
lobeliapratioides.
mallet poison
gastrolobiumdensifolium.
marlock poison
gastrolobiumparviflorum.
poison morning glory
ipomoeamuelleri.
narrow-leaf poison
gastrolobiumstenophyllum.
net-leaf poison
gastrolobiumracemosum.
poison oak
toxicodendrondiversilobum, T. quercifolium.
poison onion
dipcadiglaucum.
pea-blossom poison
poison peach
trematomentosa. Called also peach-leaf poison bush.
poison pimelea
pimeleapauciflora.
poison pod albizia
albiziaversicolor.
prickly poison
gastrolobiumspinosum.
rigid-leaf poison
gastrolobiumrigidum.
river poison
gastrolobiumforrestii.
river poison tree
excoecariadallachyana.
rock poison
gastrolobiumcallistachys.
Roe's poison
gastrolobiumspectabile.
round-leaf poison
gastrolobiumpycnostachyum.
runner poison
gastrolobiumovalifolium.
poison sage
isotropisatropurpurea.
sandplain poison
gastrolobiummicrocarpum.
scale-leaf poison
gastrolobiumappressum.
poison sedge
schoenusasperocarpus.
slender poison
gastrolobiumheterophyllum.
slender lamb poison
isotropisjuncea.
spike poison
gastrolobiumglaucum.
Stirling Range poison
gastrolobiumvelutinum.
poison suckleya
poison sumac
thick-leaf poison
gastrolobiumcrassifolium.
poison vetch
wallflower poison
gastrolobiumgrandiflorum.
wodjil poison
gastrolobiumfloribundum.
woolly poison
gastrolobiumtomentosum.
York Road poison
gastrolobiumcalycinum.

Patient discussion about poison

Q. How Do You Treat Food Poisoning? I've been suffering from food poisoning for the last two days, is there a way to treat it? Is there specific food I should avoid?

A. The most important treatment for food poisoning is drinking water. The body loses many fluids and the danger is dehydration. Our body can last longer without food than it can without water, and therefore it is ok to avoid eating as much as you used to for a short period of time until your digestive system can recover. However it is very dangerous to avoid drinking, despite the possible vomiting.At any sign of dehydration (fatigue, dizziness) you should seek medical care. In case your symptoms go on loger than expected you should visit your doctor, because antibiotic treatment may help as well.

Q. What are the Symptoms of Food Poisoning? My kid started vomiting non-stop tonight, but has doesn't have a fever. We ate lunch at this new restaurant, could this be related? What are the symptoms of food poisoning?

A. Symptoms that occur within 1–6 hours after eating the food, suggest that it is caused by a bacterial toxin or a chemical in the food. During this short "incubation period", microbes pass through the stomach into the intestine, attach to the intestinal walls, and begin to multiply there. Some types of microbes stay in the intestine, some produce a toxin that is absorbed into the bloodstream, and some can directly invade the deeper body tissues. The symptoms produced depend on the type of microbe, but are most commonly vomiting, nausea, fever and stomach aches.

Q. How can I tell if I have food poisoning? I've been having diarrhea and been vomiting for 2 days now. How can I tell if it's food poisoning or anything else?

A. when i got food poisioned i was pooping and throwing up at the same time,it lasted for about 10 hours,

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