moth

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Related to clothes moth: casemaking clothes moth, Indian meal moth

moth

(môth, mŏth)
n. pl. moths (môthz, mŏthz, môths, mŏths)
Any of numerous insects of the order Lepidoptera, generally distinguished from butterflies by their nocturnal activity, hairlike or feathery antennae, stout bodies, and the frenulum that holds the front and back wings together.

moth

a LEPIDOPTERAN that is mainly nocturnal, lacks knobbed antenae, and folds its wings flat at rest. The term has no taxonomic status.
References in periodicals archive ?
But scientists have known that clothes moths also dine on dead animals in the wild, according to entomologist Sybil Bucheli of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.
Did the clothes moth just come into existence when man first wore animal fur?
Once controlled by now-banned pesticides such as DDT, clothes moths are on the increase, according to entomologists.
Most clothes moths hitchhike into houses on used or imported woolens, then eat (and breed), preferring animal products such as wool, feathers (and down), fur, leather, or natural bristles.
There will also be a display of pest species affecting museum artefacts, some of which are also found in homes, such as woodworm, carpet beetles and clothes moths.
Colm Moore, technical manager of pest control firm Rentokil said: "Common clothes moths and their larvae thrive in warm, enclosed environments such as wardrobes, and their larvae feed on keratin which can be found in natural fibres like cotton and linen - common in vintage clothing.
The grass and Eric's fur are ideal habitats for potentially destructive critters such as clothes moths, or the caterpillar of Anthremus, the museum beetle.
People use the compound to rid human nests of carpet beetles and clothes moths and to repel intruders such as bats and starlings.
Vale of Glamorgan MP John Smith has received a letter from the House of Commons accommodation manager telling him his office in the Palace of Westminster is plagued by clothes moths which are nibbling through the carpets and curtains.
Naphthalene has long been used as a fumigant against clothes moths and carpet beetles.