closure principle

clo·sure prin·ci·ple

in psychology, the principle that when one views fragmentary stimuli forming a nearly complete figure (for example, an incomplete rectangle) one tends to ignore the missing parts and perceive the figure as whole. See: gestalt.

clo·sure prin·ci·ple

(klō'zhŭr prin'si-pĕl)
psychology The principle that when one views fragmentary stimuli forming a nearly complete figure (e.g., an incomplete rectangle) one tends to ignore the missing parts and perceive the figure as whole.
See: gestalt
References in periodicals archive ?
Kim contends, however, that embracing causal overdetermination in the mental case should be resisted for at least three reasons: (1) it is implausible, (2) it makes mental properties causally dispensable, and (3) it violates the Causal Closure Principle.
Tse therefore concludes that the closure principle is false for indeterministic systems, so it is no obstacle to mental causation.
However, my main objection is this: If Moes accepts (b) above, then his NRP model violates the causal closure principle, according to which all physical effects have sufficient physical causes.
This essay argues that, insofar as these attempts are successful, they actually establish a far stronger closure principle.
This paper argues that attempts to solve the problem should focus on closure instead; a new and plausible epistemic closure principle can solve the problem of easy knowledge.
In the first chapter, Koethe describes what he calls the transmission principle--often referred to as the closure principle.