closed population


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Related to closed population: population profile

closed population

a population into which there is no gene input from outside, i.e. the only possible genetic change is through MUTATION.

population

all of the animals in a specifically defined area considered as a whole. The population may also be defined in modes other than geography, e.g. the cow population, a species specification, the nocturnal bird population.

binomial population
see binomial population.
population cartogram
a map of populations.
case population
see case population.
closed population
e.g. closed herd or flock; a population into which no introductions are permitted, including artificial insemination or embryo transfer; the population is genetically and/or hygienically isolated.
comparison population
see comparison population.
contiguous p's
the populations are separated but have a common border. Some diseases are very difficult to restrain from spreading from one population to the next.
control population
see control population.
population density
see population density.
experimental population
the population in which the experiment, or trial, is being conducted.
finite population
one capable of total examination by census.
genetic population
see deme.
genetically defined population
one in which the ancestry of the animals in it is known.
population genetics
deals with the frequency of occurrence of inherited characteristics in a population.
infinite population
cannot be examined as a total population because they may never actually exist but are capable of statistical importance.
population limitation
restricting the growth of an animal population by desexing, by culling or by managemental means of interfering with reproduction.
population mean
the mean of the population.
population numbers
see population size (below).
open population
one in which immigration in and out is unrestrained.
parent population
the original population about which it is hoped to make some inferences by examination of a sample of its constituent members.
population proportion
the percentage of the population that has the subject characteristics.
population pyramid
a graphic presentation of the composition of a population with the largest group forming the baseline, the smallest at the apex.
population at risk
see risk population (below).
risk population
the population which is composed of animals that are exposed to the pathogenic agent under discussion and are inherently susceptible to it. Called also population at risk. High or special risk groups are those which have had more than average exposure to the pathogenic agent.
population size
actual counting of a total population, the census method, is not often possible in large animal populations. Alternatives are by various sampling techniques including area trapping, the trapping of all animals in an area, the capture-release-recapture method, the nearest neighbor and line transect methods,
The population size is expressed as the population present at a particular instant. Alternatively it can be expressed as an animal-duration expression when the population is a shifting one and it is desired to express the population size over a period (e.g. cow-day).
stable population
a population which has constant mortality and fertility rates, and no migration, therefore a fixed age distribution and constant growth rate.
target population
in epidemiological terms the population from which an experimenter wishes to draw an unbiased sample and make inferences about it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The top three ranked closed population Capture-Mark- Recapture models used to estimate brown bear population size in the different counties.
The multiple recapture census for closed populations and incomplete 2k contingency tables.
Inbreeding is unavoidable in closed populations (Falconer & Mackay 1996, Pante et al.
An important limitation of the above models is that we assumed closed populations.
In the framework of the series of capture-recapture models for closed populations described in Otis et al.
For example, it is true that over time one should simply run out of new individuals to mark in a closed population and thus acquire a complete census.
The cost in terms of both human lives and financial burden is very real and also very preventable if proper disinfection techniques are adopted by closed population institutions such as hospitals, schools and prisons.
This program assumes a closed population, tests that assumption, and selects an appropriate estimator from a set of eight models.
Pregnancy failure and suppression by female-female interaction in closed population of the red-backed vole, Clethrionomys rufocanus bedfordiae.
CAPTURE assumes a closed population over our 3-d trapping intervals, tests that assumption, and provides a series of models based on different assumptions about behavior of the animals being sampled.
However, captive populations are considered as closed populations and after several generations, excessive inbreeding can lead to reduction of genetic diversity (Ralls et al.
However, she added, chemoprophylaxis would be effective only in small or closed populations with limited mixing from the outside--like jails or residential facilities.