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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

(klōn)
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, e.g., plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.clo´nal

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

clone

Etymology: Gk, klon, a plant cutting
a group of genetically identical cells or organisms derived from a single common cell or organism through mitosis. clonal, adj.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy

clone

progeny derived from a single cell by asexual reproduction

clone

1. the genetically identical or closely similar progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell or gene, e.g. plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.

clone bank
see gene bank.
clone site
the site where insertion of the transfer DNA segment may occur on a cloning vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last year, Wilmut and his coworkers described a modified nuclear transfer method that allowed them to clone sheep from older embryonic cells (SN: 3/9/96, p.
The "open architecture" policy announced last November allows government and academic researchers to create and distribute clones made with Gateway(R) Technology without royalties or licensing fees.
Since Dolly's birth, scientists have speculated that mice, and perhaps humans, might be impossible to clone because of the speed with which their developing embryos turn on genes (SN: 4/5/97, p.
This is a unique technology for the clone market and will modernize the way laboratories collect, store and back-up clone samples," said David Wellis, senior vice president, marketing and sales, GenVault.
The proposal comes after researchers in Scotland announced last month that they had transferred the DNA from an adult sheep into an egg, creating a lamb named ``Dolly'' that is a genetic twin - or clone - of the original.
In sprawling vistas of the Texas Hill Country, suntanned ranchers are wondering why anyone would want to clone a sheep, since they all look pretty much alike to begin with.
Senator Bond and others worry about a gory scenario in which clones would be created to provide spare parts, such as organs that would not be rejected by the predecessor's immune system.
Also, a gene normally turned off in senescent cells was even more active in cells of the clones than in normal young cells.
As animated shorts, CLONE WARS is the perfect content to watch on an iPod," said Tom Warner, Senior Director of Marketing for Lucasfilm Ltd.
You don't know what you're dealing with in making clones,'' she said.
0 can remotely install the Windows[TM] operating system, create clones of Windows and Linux systems and significantly improve business continuity with its new disaster recovery capability.
Many of the scientists invited to testify detailed the low success rates they've had at cloning animals and described deformities and other physical problems experienced by the few clones that do survive to birth.