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clone

 [klōn]
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, such as plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny. adj., adj clo´nal.

In 1997 a lamb was cloned in the United Kingdom, and in 2001 a cat was cloned in Texas. The idea of cloning animals remains a controversial subject that is being discussed by ethicists.

clone

(klōn),
1. A colony or group of organisms (or an individual organism), or a colony of cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
4. A homogeneous population of DNA molecules.
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

(klōn)
1. the genetically identical progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell, or gene, e.g., plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.clo´nal

clone

(klōn)
n.
1. A group of cells or organisms that are descended from and genetically identical to a single progenitor, such as a bacterial colony whose members arose from a single original cell.
2. An organism developed asexually from another and genetically identical to it, such as an animal produced from an egg cell into which the nucleus of an adult individual has been transferred.
3. A DNA sequence, such as a gene, that is transferred from one organism to another and replicated by genetic engineering techniques.
v. cloned, cloning, clones
v.tr.
1. To make multiple identical copies of (a DNA sequence).
2. To create or propagate (an organism) from a clone cell: clone a sheep.
3. To reproduce or propagate asexually: clone a plant variety.
v.intr.
To grow as a clone.

clon′al (klō′nəl) adj.
clon′al·ly adv.
clon′er n.

clone

Etymology: Gk, klon, a plant cutting
a group of genetically identical cells or organisms derived from a single common cell or organism through mitosis. clonal, adj.

clone

A population of cells derived from a single parent cell and thus genetically identical; genetic differences in clonal population may arise from random spontaneous mutations during cell growth

clone

(klōn)
1. A colony of organisms or cells derived from a single organism or cell by asexual reproduction, all having identical genetic constitutions.
2. To produce such a colony or individual.
3. A short section of DNA that has been copied by means of gene cloning.
See: cloning
[G. klōn, slip, cutting used for propagation]

clone

1. A perfect copy, or a population of perfect copies, of any organism. Cloning occurs when an organism reproduces non-sexually, so that the genetic content (genome) of each is identical.
2. A number of identical cells derived from a single cell by repetitive division.
3. A perfect copy, or any number of copies, of any DNA sequence, such as a gene, or any other nucleotide sequence.

clone

  1. any of two or more individuals with identical genetic makeup produced from one parent by ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION. Examples of clones are daughter plants produced by strawberry RUNNERS, and whole plants produced by tissue culture.
  2. the identical individuals produced by the splitting of a young embryo.
  3. to produce a set of identical DNA molecules or identical individuals from a single DNA molecule or single cell, as in GENETIC ENGINEERING.

Clone

A cell or organism derived through asexual (without sex) reproduction containing the identical genetic information of the parent cell or organism.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy

clone

progeny derived from a single cell by asexual reproduction

clone

1. the genetically identical or closely similar progeny produced by the natural or artificial asexual reproduction of a single organism, cell or gene, e.g. plant cuttings, a cell culture descended from a single cell, or genes reproduced by recombinant DNA technology.
2. to establish or produce such a line of progeny.

clone bank
see gene bank.
clone site
the site where insertion of the transfer DNA segment may occur on a cloning vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cloning involves removing the DNA from the nucleus of an egg cell taken from a mother and replacing it with genetic material contained in a cell taken from whatever is being cloned.
Since Dolly the cloned sheep was born in 1996, some scientists have speculated that the donor cells used to create her and other cloned animals were rare adult stem cells--immature cells that have the potential to create a multitude of other cell types.
In May, 2005, Hwang claimed to have produced eleven "patient specific" stem cell lines from cloned human embryos by transferring somatic cell nuclei from patients into donated ova whose nucleus had been removed.
With the support of groups favoring research cloning, many states are considering (and some have passed) laws that allow placing cloned human embryos in women's wombs, but forbid any attempt to let them be born alive.
1997 - Scientists introduce Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from cells of any adult animal.
MOUSE: Scientists have cloned 50 mice identical to the first mouse clone, named Cumulina, that was born in 1997.
Chromatin transfer (CT) involves pre-treating the cell of the animal to be cloned to remove molecules associated with cellular differentiation.
The company has since claimed to have created working kidneys from cloned cow embryos.
The cost to future pet owners could be as high as $200,000, and cloned animals tend to have serious health problems.
The creation of any cloned child with a changed genome would be in addition a Promethean grasp at the human germ line, but even cloning a person without genetic manipulation would convert kinship and childhood into just the sort of commodities those sixty cell lines have become.
The council's arguments center on preventing harm to the cloned child, but the language in which they are developed is sermonizing about the embryo's special significance.