clofazimine


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Related to clofazimine: dapsone

clofazimine

 [klo-fa´zĭ-mēn]
an antibacterial effective against Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium leprae.

clofazimine

Lamprene® Therapeutics A lipophilic rhimophenazine used to manage leprosy and, with other drugs, atypical Mycobacterium infections–eg, MAC, discoid lupus, pyoderma gangrenosum Adverse effects GI upset, skin discoloration, rash

clofazimine

A drug used to treat LEPROSY. It is effective in controlling the ERYTHEMA NODOSUM reaction. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Lamprene.

clofazimine

a human antileprosy drug used in the treatment of feline leprosy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The daily regimen consisted of ethambutol (800 mg), pyrazinamide (1,600 mg), prothionamide (500 mg), moxifloxacin (400 mg), and clofazimine (100 mg).
Tuberculoid leprosy is treated with 6 months of dapsone and rifampin, whereas in cases of lepromatous leprosy, clofazimine in addition to both dapsone and rifampin is used for 12 months (14).
Consider adding in Bedaquiline consultation with specialist Linezolid if four drugs from other Clofazimine groups are possibly not High-dose isoniazid effective Amoxicillin/clavulanate Imipenem/clavulanate Meropenem/clavulanate Clarithromycin WHO = World Health Organization; DST = drug-susceptibility testing; DR-TB = drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Leprosy is curable with Multidrug Therapy (MDT), a powerful combination of two to three drugs: clofazimine, rifampicin and dapsone.
Common side-effects of clofazimine include loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, dry skin and discoloration of skin.
A WHO study group in 1994 recommended Multidrug therapy (MDT) consisting of the drugs: dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine.
The old drug called clofazimine, made in the 1890s originally failed to treat tuberculosis but has worked well as an antileprosy medicine.
Activity of a new class of isonicotinoylhydrazones used alone and in combination with isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, para-aminosalicylic acid and clofazimine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Leprosy is now typically cured with multiple drug therapy (some combination of rifampicin, clofazimine and dapsone) administered for six to 12 months, sometimes longer.
The compound clofazimine was as effective as chloroquine diphosphate in controlling active cutaneous lesions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who participated in a small randomized study.
One recent report of clofazimine combined with a macrolide and ethambutol without the use of any rifamycin showed successful treatment with an 87% sputum conversion rate after 10 months of therapy.