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spider

 [spi´der]
1. an arthropod of the class Arachnida.
spider bite in the United States, the two spiders whose bites are most likely to cause a serious reaction are the black widow spider(Latrodectus mactans) and the brown recluse spider(Loxosceles reclusa). Signs and symptoms are associated with the effects of injection of the venom and include pain at the injection site, weakness, muscle pain and cramps, elevated blood pressure, and restlessness. Bites by these spiders must be treated promptly and effectively. First aid is the same as that for a snakebite and includes the following:

1. Wash the wound with soap and water and apply a clean dressing.

2. Apply a constricting band between the area of the bite and the heart.

3. Keep the person calm and transport him to the hospital or medical facility as soon as possible.

4. If swelling becomes apparent, apply a cold compress to the area.
black widow spider Latrodectus mactans, a poisonous spider found in North America; see spider bite.
brown recluse spider Loxosceles reclusa, a poisonous spider found in North America; see spider bite.
vascular spider a telangiectasis due to dilatation and branching of superficial cutaneous arteries, which presents as a bright red central portion with branching radiations, the whole somewhat resembling the configuration of a spider. The lesions may occur singly or in large numbers, and may be nevoid or acquired, being commonly associated with pregnancy and liver disease. Called also nevus araneus, spider nevus, and spider telangiectasia.

spi·der

(spī'dĕr),
1. An arthropod of the order Araneida (subclass Arachnida) characterized by four pairs of legs; a cephalothorax; a globose, smooth abdomen; and a complex of web-spinning spinnerets. Among the venomous spiders found in the New World are the black widow spider, Latrodectus mactans; red-legged widow spider, Latrodectus bishopi; pruning spider, or Peruvian tarantula, Glyptocranium gasteracanthoides; Chilean brown spider, Loxosceles laeta; Peruvian brown spider, Loxosceles rufipes; brown recluse spider of North America, Loxosceles reclusus.
2. An obstructive growth in the teat of a cow.
[O. E. spinnan, to spin]

spider

/spi·der/ (spi´der)
1. an arthropod of the class Arachnida.

arterial spider  vascular s.
black widow spider  a spider, Latrodectus mactans, whose bite causes severe poisoning.
vascular spider  a telangiectasis caused by dilatation and ramification of superficial cutaneous arteries, appearing as a bright red central area with branching rays somewhat resembling a spider; commonly associated with pregnancy and liver disease.

spider

(spī′dər)
n.
Any of numerous arachnids of the order Araneae, having a body divided into a cephalothorax and an abdomen, eight legs, two chelicerae that bear venom glands, and two or more spinnerets that produce the silk used to make nests, cocoons, or webs for trapping insects.
A term of art referring to a thing likened to a spider, either morphologically, or functionally
Dermatology See Spider angioma
Entomology A chelicerate arthropod of the class Arachnida, which has 8 legs, a cephalothorax, a smooth, round abdomen, and equipment for spinning webs; 2 spiders are of medical importance in the US: Latrodectus mactans, the black widow spider, and Loxosceles reclusa, the North American brown recluse spider
Online A software program that resides in a PC and, when launched, crawls the Web for requested information, searching for keywords in the title or text of digitalised documents, simultaneously scanning entire libraries of documents, and tracking down millions of cross-references; when finished, the spider ranks the files in order of probable relevance

spider

Dermatology See Spider angioma Entomology A chelicerate arthropod of the class Arachnida, which has 8 legs, a cephalothorax, a smooth, round abdomen, and equipment for spinning webs; 2 spiders are of medical importance in the US: Lactrodectus mactans, the black widow spider and Loxosceles reclusus, the North American brown recluse spider. See Black widow spider, Brown recluse spider.

spi·der

(spī'dĕr)
1. An arthropod of the order Araneida characterized by having four pairs of legs; a cephalothorax; a globose, smooth abdomen; and a complex of spinnerets, which build the web. Among the venomous spiders are the black widow spider, Latrodectus mactans, and the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusus.
2. Synonym(s): spider angioma.
[O. E. spinnan, to spin]

spider

an arthropod of the class Arachnida.

black widow spider
see latrodectus mactans.
brown recluse spider
a poisonous spider, Loxoceles reclusa, whose bite causes severe poisoning in humans.
spider lily
see crinum.
trapdoor spider
Atrax robustus. Called also funnel-web spider.
spider grass
brachyachneconvergens.
spider lamb syndrome
inherited arachnomelia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cloaking is not yet hiding anybody from Voldemort's lackeys or thwarting interstellar rescue missions.
Paper: "Transformation Thermodynamics: Cloaking and Concentrating Heat Flux," Guenneau et al.
The assessment, routinely shared with Leonhardt, indicated that the reviewer had been to two meetings in the previous months "in which John Pendry discussed his group's efforts on the same issue, calling it a cloaking device or their Hogwarts project in reference to the cloak of invisibility associated with the Harry Potter series.
Light absorption in the wire drops slightly - by a factor of just four - but the scattering of light drops by 100 times due to the cloaking effect, becoming invisible," said Fan.
Cloaking at visible-light frequencies isn't yet feasible, Smith notes.
Until now, however, cloaking techniques have come with a significant limitation--they need to be orders of magnitude larger than the object being cloaked.
It's really because of the development of metamaterials that the manufacturing of such cloaking devices could be possible," Leonhardt says.
Cohen also believes that success in cloaking science requires a body of diverse knowledge, which in his case drew upon experience as an astronomer, and curiously, as a radio ham operator.
Initial research into cloaking from light waves began about six years ago, but very little work has been done on waves in solid bodies such as waves produced by earthquakes despite its fundamental importance in a number of areas including the protection of buildings and their components.
The firm's fractal metamaterial and cloaking work are found at: www.
While previous studies have either been theoretical in nature or limited to the cloaking of two-dimensional objects, this new study by US researchers shows how ordinary objects can be cloaked in their natural environment in all directions and from all of an observer's positions.
Even before that cloaking takes place, CMV needs to deceive the cell, says Gilbert.