cloaca


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cloaca

 [klo-a´kah] (pl. cloa´cae) (L.)
1. a common passage for fecal, urinary, and reproductive discharge in most lower vertebrates.
2. in mammalian embryos, the terminal end of the hindgut before division into rectum, bladder, and the primordia of the reproductive organs.
3. an opening in the covering or sheath of a necrosed bone. adj., adj cloa´cal.

clo·a·ca

(klō-ā'kă),
1. In early embryos, the endodermally lined chamber into which the hindgut and allantois empty.
2. In birds and monotremes, the common chamber into which open the hindgut, bladder, and genital ducts.
[L. sewer]

cloaca

/clo·a·ca/ (klo-a´kah) pl. cloa´cae   [L.]
1. a common passage for fecal, urinary, and reproductive discharge in most lower vertebrates.
2. the terminal end of the hindgut before division into rectum, bladder, and genital primordia in mammalian embryos.
3. an opening in the involucrum of a necrosed bone.cloa´cal

cloaca

(klō-ā′kə)
n. pl. cloa·cae (-sē′)
Zoology
a. The common cavity that serves as the opening for the intestinal, genital, and urinary tracts in many vertebrates, including amphibians, reptiles, birds, monotremes, and some fishes.
b. The posterior part of the intestinal tract in various invertebrates.

clo·a′cal (-kəl) adj.

cloaca

[klō·ā′kə] pl. cloacae
Etymology: L, sewer
1 (in embryology) the end of the hindgut before the developmental division into the rectum, the bladder, and the primitive genital structures.
2 (in pathology) an opening into the sheath of tissue around a necrotic bone.

cloaca

Embryology
The terminal hindgut before it divides into the rectum, bladder and genital primordia.
 
Pathology
An obsolete term for an opening in the involucrum of necrotic bone.
 
Zoology
A common conduit in most lower vertebrates for faecal, urinary and reproductive discharge.

clo·a·ca

, pl. cloacae (klō-ā'kă, -sē)
1. In early embryos, the endodermally lined chamber into which the hindgut and allantois empty.
2. In birds and monotremes, the common chamber into which the hindgut, bladder, and genital ducts empty.
[L. sewer]

cloaca

The combined urinary and faecal opening in the embryo before the two become separated. The term derives from the Latin cloaca a sewer.

cloaca

the terminal part of the gut system of most vertebrates (except higher mammals) into which the ducts from the kidney and reproductive system open. In these types there is thus only one posterior aperture to the body as compared with two in mammals, the anus and the opening of the urinogenital system. In some vertebrates, such as birds, the cloaca is reversible and forms a penis-like structure in the males during copulation.

cloaca

perforation of bone cortex in osteomyelitis, through which pus escapes, to form a Brodie's abscess

cloaca

pl. cloacae [L.]
1. a common passage for fecal, urinary and reproductive discharge in most lower vertebrates.
2. the terminal end of the hindgut before division into rectum, bladder and genital primordia in mammalian embryos.
3. an opening in the involucrum of a necrosed bone.

avian cloaca
in birds the cloaca is divided into three poorly defined compartments: a coprodeum or a continuation of the rectum, a urodeum into which the urogenital ducts open (in the female the left genital duct is the oviduct) and the proctodeum which carries the cloacal bursa and the proctodeal glands.
common cloaca
the urorectal septum fails to develop; defecation and urination share a common cavity. Seen in Manx cat.
References in periodicals archive ?
in all other salamanders the collecting ducts bend caudally during development (Rodgers and Risley, 1938) and either anastomose and enter the cloaca (in the Plethodontidae and some Salamandridae; Francis, 1934; Baker, 1965; Strickland, 1966), anastomose and enter Wolthan ducts (in the Ambystomatidae, Amphiumidae, and some Salamandridae, Baker, 1945; Baker and Taylor, 1964; Baker, 1965), or enter the cloaca individually (in the Cryptobranchidae and Hynobiidae; Ratcliff, 1965; Yamagiwa, 1924).
Sex of these doves was determined via pelvic spread and then confirmed via direct examination of gonads or cloaca.
08) times first sting length; distance from cloaca to sting base 0.
Its kinetic fixation looks back to Wim Delvoye's Cloaca (2000), a room-sized machine that operates as a human digestive system, and Tim Hawkinson's massive Uberorgan (2000) installation of big plastic balloons and tubing simulating human respiration.
It creates an almost suspenseful narrative movement, not forward with time's arrow but along a downward spiral toward the abyss at the center of the novel, the cloaca that is the fictionalized city of Santa Teresa, around which all the characters revolve and from which all the world's evil threatens to emerge.
Davies (1983) described the unusual behavior of cloaca-pecking in the polygynandrous Dunnock in which males peck female cloacas to induce release of sperm from other males.
Finally, the poet scrambles the letters of Coca-Cola to form the word cloaca, meaning a "filthy place" or cesspool.
Berrang, Northcutt, and colleagues determined that the increase is caused by escape of highly contaminated fecal matter from the cloaca (lower gut) during feather removal.
Stephen is hoping that Marian, Again gets a better response than his recent appearance on stage, in the play Cloaca at the Old Vic.
Professor Stefan Rhein, director of the Luther Memorial Foundation, told the Telegraph he believes Luther was sitting precisely on this pot when he crafted one of the biggest movements in modern history, citing Luther's frequent talk of constipation and a reference to writing the Theses in cloaca (Latin for "sewer").
He is currently starring in Cloaca, Kevin Spacey's first play as artistic director at The Old Vic Theatre.