enclitic

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enclitic

(en-klit′ik) [L. encliticus, fr Gr. enklitikos, leaning on]
Having the planes of the fetal head inclined to those of the maternal pelvis.

enclitic

having the planes of the fetal head inclined to those of the maternal pelvis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Free form Clitic Romanian mine ma Albanian mua (< mene) me New Greek (e)mena me
My corpus contains about fifty examples of clitic pronouns accompanying the following constructions: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with aorist participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present, perfect and aorist participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present and future participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with future participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with aorist and perfect participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with future participle and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present and perfect participle.
The second way of encoding direction is through what I would like to call marking, which consists of the use of a directional morpheme tightly attached to the locative form, as an affix or a clitic.
Resembling a suffix or an inflectional ending, clitics are words that attach to the end of the preceding word: "English, for instance, has auxiliary verbs like is, has, and have, which may become clitic to words preceding them: .
Example 5 occurred following a pause and repetition of the clitic object pronoun.
But the majority of the volume is taken up with the 108 charters, which have been scrupulously edited according to diplomatic principles in the sense that there is no attempt to punctuate or to introduce conventional word separation by means of the apostrophe or the clitic stop.
For instance, within prosody, it has been suggested that there are exactly four levels of stress (weak, tertiary, secondary, and primary) and four levels of prosodic phrasing in the prosodic hierarchy (syllable, clitic phrase, phonological phrase, and intonational unit).
It is similar to -mi in that it is a clitic, but -man is much more limited than -mi, and in most cases it simply marks gumma protases and the apodoses of counterfactual conditionals.
The clitic ne works for direct object of transitive verbs (as in [3] and [6]) but also for some subjects of so-called intransitive verbs that take essere as auxiliary (as in [5] and [8]).
Another case is the emphatic clitic =bu, glossed as 'again' in example (234) but as 'EMPH' in (235).
Garcia: The Motivated Syntax of Arbitrary Signs: Cognitive Constraints on Spanish Clitic Clustering.
For example, the final string -nya is a frequently a clitic pronoun 'his, her, their', as in bukunya 'her book'.