clinician


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Related to clinician: nurse clinician

clinician

 [klĭ-nish´an]
an expert clinical practitioner and teacher.
nurse clinician see nurse clinician.

cli·ni·cian

(klin-ish'ŭn),
A health professional engaged in the care of patients, as distinguished from one working in other areas of practice.

clinician

/cli·ni·cian/ (klĭ-nish´in) an expert clinical physician and teacher.

clinician

(klĭ-nĭsh′ən)
n.
A health professional, such as a physician, psychologist, or nurse, who is directly involved in patient care, as distinguished from one who does only research or administrative work.

clinician

[klinish′ən]
a health professional whose practice is based on direct observation and treatment of a patient, as distinguished from other types of health workers, such as laboratory technicians and those employed in research.

clinician

A qualified healthcare professional in the UK.

Examples
Doctor, nurse, midwife, pharmacist, psychologist, allied health professional—e.g. dietician, occupational therapist, physiotherapist, podiatrist, and speech and language therapist. Also social workers/care managers if they are part of the team providing direct patient care.

clinician

A health care professional–physician, physician assistant, or nurse–involved in active Pt management. See Primary mental health care clinician, Staff clinician. Cf Academician.

cli·ni·cian

(klin-ish'ŭn)
A health care professional engaged in the care of patients, as distinguished from one working in other areas.

clinician

Any doctor, of any speciality, dealing directly with patients.

cli·ni·cian

(klin-ish'ŭn)
A health care professional engaged in the care of patients.

clinician,

n a licensed dental professional who provides preventative, therapeutic, and educational services that promote oral health.

clinician

a veterinarian skilled in working at first hand with sick animals in clinical surroundings, which may be in a closed environment such as a hospital, or in a field environment. May be medically, surgically or reproductively inclined.
References in periodicals archive ?
About NEBA accuracy Previous studies have supported that a multidisciplinary team of clinicians is better able than an individual clinician to determine if ADHD-like symptoms are due to another primary condition.
Thus there is a symbiotic relationship between the clinician and academic undertaking clinical research--each needs the expertise and skills of the other.
We found that having a laboratory professional contact the clinician and systematically ask the scripted questions was a pragmatic tool for the first phase of response and resulted in cancellation of most tests.
Clinicians will include Cindy Harrington and Mary Van de Loo from Lawrence University.
During the 1990s, dermoscopy--also called epiluminescence microscopy because it lights and magnifies features on the skin's surface--was developed as a tool for dermatologists, general practitioners, and other clinicians.
Applicability for Invisalign, dictation of the treatment plan, and final acceptance of ClinCheck are all determined by the treating clinician.
If the system is frequently down or if the clinician has to wait for information to appear, usage drops dramatically.
Five graduate clinicians in speech-language pathology alternated the responsibility of leading group activities with the children.
These displays will include not only the images and the textual interpretation, but perhaps also audio or e-mail communications between the radiologist and the clinician concerning the radiological findings.
Identify current federal guidelines from these choices: (a) clinicians should reduce use of pain-relieving drugs, especially narcotics, because current practices rely too much on expensive medication and may create drug dependence among the elderly; or (b) clinicians should increase use of pain-relieving drugs, including narcotics, because current practices are overly cautious and lead to unnecessary suffering; or (c) both of the above.
quality filtering or critical appraisal of the literature in which the librarian or clinician evaluates the quality as well as the content of the literature and its applicability to patient care;
InforSense collaborated with the Windber Research Institute (WRI) to create a workflow-based decision support solution that enables clinicians to easily browse and dynamically drill down into large patient data sets to identify key risk factors for better decision-making in patient care, which has been commercialized within HealthSense.

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