clinical suspicion

clinical suspicion

A working hypothesis about a Pt's diagnosis, which is then tested with appropriately targeted tests to arrive at a definitive diagnosis; a CS is based on a constellation of findings in a Pt that suggests to the physician a limited palette of possible diagnoses

clin·i·cal sus·pi·cion

(klin'i-kăl sŭs-pi'shŭn)
A strong presumption that, absent a diagnostic or algorithmic certainty, a patient is suffering from a given disorder or state (e.g., AIDS, tuberculosis, pregnancy).
References in periodicals archive ?
In patients with low clinical suspicion of CD, other immuno-logic markers, preferably EMAs, should be measured before an IB is performed.
Our results show that, because microarray analysis can identify chromosome abnormalities in individuals with nonspecific symptoms, such as developmental delay, without the need for clinical suspicion of a specific disorder, it may allow earlier diagnoses for syndromes such as Pitt Hopkins.
Multiplex real-time pcr, allows detection sumultanea than 5 batteries in patients with respiratory clinical suspicion, reagents and supplies include kit of 50 reactions.
Clinical suspicion of NTM middle ear infection should be raised in any chronically draining ear unresponsive to standard antibiotic therapy regardless of a patients age or immune system status.
Data from 482 European hospitals reveal that in a single day, an average of 109 cases of CDI are missed due to a lack of clinical suspicion or inadequate laboratory testing, potentially leading to more than 39,000 missed cases in Europe each year.
Correctly establishing the diagnosis, then, requires appropriate levels of clinical suspicion, and also requires that the radiologist be aware of the potential limitations of the initial NCT and be prepared to suggest alternative imaging strategies for appropriate patients.
Prompt use of cross-sectional imaging and clinical suspicion will help to recognize the correct pathology and will allow physicians to treat patients expeditiously.
Clinical suspicion of TB may be important for a favourable outcome in the ICU setting in patients who present risk factors for the disease (origin from countries with increased incidence, suspicious radiology, positive tuberculin test etc.
This guideline has been expanded to recommend that patients with a psychiatric illness and low clinical suspicion of a general medical condition need only a clinical examination with basic observations and a random blood glucose level measurement in the EC before referral to the mental health services (patients >60 years also require urinalysis to exclude urinary tract infection).
Indeed clinical suspicion can be lessened by the absence of hard initial signs of arterial injury (6) and the patient may present much later with potentially irreversible sequelae, particularly brachial plexus injuries (5).
A high degree of clinical suspicion for WNV infection should be considered in patients with a recent history of mosquito bites and an acute febrile illness associated with neurologic signs and symptoms (5).
Clinical suspicion and spinal fluid examination are keys to the diagnosis of neurosyphilis.

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