clinical pathology


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to clinical pathology: Clinical chemistry, Diploma in Clinical Pathology

pathology

 [pah-thol´o-je]
1. the branch of medicine treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs that cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease. adj., adj patholog´ic, patholog´ical.
clinical pathology pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis.
comparative pathology that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of other animals.
experimental pathology the study of artificially induced pathologic processes.
oral pathology that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomic or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
speech pathology (speech-language pathology) a field of the health sciences dealing with the evaluation of speech, language, and voice disorders and the rehabilitation of patients with such disorders not amenable to medical or surgical treatment. See also speech-language pathologist.
surgical pathology the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.

clin·i·cal pa·thol·o·gy

1. any part of the medical practice of pathology as it pertains to the care of patients;
2. the subspecialty in pathology concerned with the theoretical and technical aspects (that is, the methods or procedures) of chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, parasitology, immunology, hematology, and other fields as they pertain to the diagnosis of disease and the care of patients, as well as to the prevention of disease.

clinical pathology

the laboratory study of disease by a pathologist using techniques appropriate to the specimen being studied. Among the many branches of clinical pathology are hematology, microbiology, clinical chemistry, immunology, toxicology, and the blood bank.

chemical pathology

The pathology specialty in the UK which is involved in measuring electrolytes, metabolic products, hormones, proteins and toxins in blood, urine and other body fluids to diagnose and monitor disease.

clinical pathology

The field of pathology dedicated to measuring and/or identifying substances, cells, or microorganisms in body fluids Areas Clinical microbiology–bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology; immunology; chemistry; hematology; immunohematology–blood banking. Cf Anatomic pathology, Surgical pathology.

clin·i·cal pa·thol·o·gy

(klin'i-kăl pă-thol'ŏ-jē)
1. Any part of the medical practice of pathology as it pertains to the care of patients.
2. pathology Subspecialty concerned with the theoretic and technical aspects of chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, parasitology, immunology, hematology, and other fields as they pertain to the diagnosis of disease.

clinical pathology

The science and practice of medical diagnosis by laboratory examination and analysis of tissue specimens (BIOPSIES), body fluids and other samples. Clinical pathology is subdivided into VIROLOGY, BACTERIOLOGY, clinical chemistry, SEROLOGY and pathological HISTOLOGY.

clinical

1. pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside and therefore carried out on the living animal.
2. pertaining to or founded on actual observation and treatment of patients, as distinguished from theoretical or experimental.
3. productive of clinical signs; thus clinical disease as distinct from subclinical.

clinical data storage
storage of clinical data about patients; may be paper or computerized.
clinical decision analysis
the application of clinical, epidemiological and other data to influence outome probability and alternative decisions in such areas as surgery and pharmaceutical treatment.
clinical epidemiologist
an epidemiologist who sees patients and herds in a clinical capacity but with an epidemiological viewpoint. An investigator of clinical problems affecting populations.
clinical epidemiology
the application by a veterinarian who provides direct patient care of epidemiological methods to the study of diagnosis and therapeutics in order to promote efficiency in clinical care.
clinical examination
an examination of a patient including taking the history, physical examination by palpation, auscultation and percussion, clinicopathological examination and examination of the environment.
clinical judgment
exerted while the patient is still alive; the critical decisions made on the basis of scientific observations but with the added skill provided by long experience of similar cases. To this must be added an innate ability to make balanced judgments based not only on the state of the animal and its predictable future but also on some consideration for the patient's overall well-being and the client's financial status and degree of psychological, or in some cases actual, dependence on the patient.
clinical nomenclature
a catalog of the names given to diseases and problems of animals; usually alphabetical, may be numerical. Should contain keywords (including key diagnoses and key signs) and synonyms with each list related to the other. Because of the need to sort banks of clinical data into categories it is essential that recording be accurate and that the catalog be limited—a policy of limited vocabulary.
clinical pathologist
a veterinarian skilled in clinical pathology.
clinical pathology
the examination of diseased tissues, fluids or other materials from a living patient, using all of the techniques available including chemistry, hematology, enzymology, cytology, microbiology, parasitology, protozoology, immunology and histopathology.
clinical pharmacology
the study of the actions and metabolism of drugs in living animals.
clinical policies
professional rules of thumb which are used to decide on the management of a case when there are no research results on which to base decisions. They are policies originated by the senior members of the profession, especially those in academic posts.
clinical propedeutics
preliminary training in the clinical sciences; the introduction to veterinary medicine, surgery and animal reproduction.
clinical qualifiers
adjectives used to qualify diagnoses using terms from within a group of standard variables, e.g. chronic or acute, ovine or bovine, benign or malignant, clinical or latent.
clinical record
the record, made at the time, of clinical examinations, treatments and advice given, complete with dates, names of individuals concerned and drugs or tests used. The record is desirable for the purpose of evaluating the patient's progress, and essential from the legal point of view if arguments should arise about competence or justness of charges made.
clinical signs
the abnormalities of structure or function observed in the patient by the veterinarian or the client. These are customarily graded according to severity, e.g. severe, moderate, mild, and according to speed of onset and progress, e.g. peracute, acute, subacute, chronic, intermittent.
clinical trials
a planned experiment, conducted in the field, designed to test the efficacy of a treatment in herds of animals by comparing the outcome under the test treatment with that observed in a comparable group of animal herds receiving a control treatment.
clinical vocabulary
a catalog of terms approved for use in the description of clinical signs and problems, and for the definition of diagnoses and diseases.

pathology

1. the branch of veterinary science treating of the essential nature of disease, especially of the changes in body tissues and organs which cause or are caused by disease.
2. the structural and functional manifestations of a disease.

clinical pathology
see clinical pathology.
comparative pathology
that which considers human disease processes in comparison with those of the lower animals.
experimental pathology
the study of artificially induced pathological processes.
oral pathology
that which treats of conditions causing or resulting from morbid anatomical or functional changes in the structures of the mouth.
surgical pathology
the pathology of disease processes that are surgically accessible for diagnosis or treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The target population was all pathology residents in anatomic and clinical pathology residency programs in the United States.
Finally, for the broader goal of residency education and documentation, full-time use of this database serves as a 24/7 adjunct to "morning report" and to other teaching modalities outlined in the clinical pathology curriculum guidelines developed by the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists (4).
html) for clinical pathology and the NTP PCT (http://hazel.
The Ward Burdick Award is the top and oldest honor given by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).
The Tax Equity and Fiscal responsibility Act of 1982 and the Social Security Amendments of 1983 instituted diagnosis-related groups, put an end to bundled payment for the professional and technical portions of clinical laboratory tests, essentially abolished any reimbursement for pathologists' involvement in clinical pathology, and made payment for the so-called Professional Services to the Provider (Part A) extremely problematic.
Editors Barger and Macneill present students, instructors, and veterinary medicine professionals working in a wide variety of contexts with a collection of contributions from professors of veterinary medicine focused on laboratory techniques and clinical pathology.
Dahl-Chase Pathology Associates is a professional group of 13 board-certified pathologists, which has sought to provide the most cost-effective, highest quality anatomic and clinical pathology services, since its inception in 1971.
I have spent more than 30 years practicing community anatomic and clinical pathology.
The Lab21 service is being launched concurrently with new guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer which were recently issued by the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).
of New York Downstate Medical Center) assemble 77 chapters by a group of pathologists and other clinicians from the US, Brazil, and Japan who provide knowledge for trainees, pathologists, and other laboratory personnel in clinical pathology and laboratory medicine.
Curriculum content and evaluation of competency in clinical pathology (laboratory medicine): a proposal.

Full browser ?