clinical inertia


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clinical inertia

Inaction by a prescriber when guidelines or optimal care would recommend a more aggressive course.
Synonym: therapeutic inertia
See also: inertia
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References in periodicals archive ?
Even though Argentina has a National Diabetes Program (34) which supplies free insulin for all diabetes patients, clinical inertia and patient resistance are still barriers that delay insulin treatment.
The delayed implementation of this recommendation is an example of clinical inertia, which can contribute to further misunderstandings about the role and effect of insulin therapy.
We now develop a similar quality measure for measuring clinical inertia in diabetes care by evaluating the pharmacologic management of diabetes in patients with ready access to clinicians and medications through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).
However, some technical aspects of the proposed measure of HbA1c-related clinical inertia require further attention.
5,6) Physician failure to prescribe adequate doses of medication, so-called clinical inertia, may also be a factory Causes and remedies for pseudo-resistance are summarized in the algorithm on page 643.
Panelists at the briefing cited lack of awareness about guidelines, lack of time, and lack of reimbursement as possible reasons for clinical inertia.
Clinical inertia in response to inadequate glycemic control: do specialists differ from primary care physicians?
The phenomenon of clinical inertia has been described in the context of other conditions such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, as well as in other aspects of diabetes care, he said.
The major barriers to implementing this practice may be overcoming clinical inertia, and the message of pharmaceutical marketing on behalf of the more expensive alternatives.
LDL close enough" was by far the most common reason for clinical inertia.
Although the term "clinical inertia" in no way describes what occurs during my encounters with patients with Type 2 diabetes, if we use NASH as a "soft reason" to avoid statins or to discontinue them, then clinical inertia is the only term that accurately describes our behavior.
Clinical inertia has been described with other conditions such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, as well as in aspects of diabetes care.

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