clinical


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Related to clinical: clinical depression, clinical pathology, Clinical pharmacology, Clinical research, Clinical trials

clinical

 [klin´ĭ-k'l]
pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside; pertaining to or founded on actual observation and treatment of patients, as distinguished from theoretical or experimental.
clinical laboratory scientist/medical technologist (CLS/MT) a laboratory professional who has all the skills possessed by a clinical laboratory technician as well as the ability to perform complex analyses, fine line discrimination, and correction of errors. This technologist assumes responsibility and is held accountable for accurate results and establishes and monitors quality control and quality assurance programs, designing or modifying procedures as necessary. Academic programs are accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Certification as MT is through the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, whose address is P.O. Box 12270, Chicago, IL 60612 (telephone 312-738-1336). Certification as CLT is through the National Credentialing Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. The address of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences is 7910 Woodmont Ave., Suite 1301, Bethesda, MD 20814 (telephone 301-657-2768).
clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician (CLT/MLT) a laboratory professional skilled in the performance of clinical laboratory analyses. Associate degree or certificate programs are accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, whose address is 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631 (telephone 773-714-8880). Certification as MLT(ASCP) is through the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, whose address is P.O. Box 12270, Chicago, IL 60612 (telephone 312-738-1336). Certification as CLT is through the National Credentialing Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel, whose address is P.O. Box 15945-289, Lenexa, KS 66285 (telephone 913-438-5110).

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl),
1. Relating to the bedside of a patient or to the course of the disease.
2. Denoting the symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from the laboratory findings of anatomic changes.
3. Relating to a clinic.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

clinical

/clin·i·cal/ (klin´ĭ-k'l) pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside; pertaining to or founded on actual observation and treatment of patients, as distinguished from theoretical or basic sciences.

clinical

(klĭn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or connected with a clinic.
2. Involving or based on direct observation of a patient: a clinical diagnosis; clinical research.

clin′i·cal·ly adv.

clinical

[klin′ikəl]
Etymology: Gk, kline, bed
1 pertaining to a clinic.
2 pertaining to direct bedside medical or nursing care.
3 pertaining to materials or equipment used in the care of a sick person.
4 pertaining to experience of students in an educational program or experience.

clinical

adjective
1. Pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside; that which can be observed in Pts .
2. Pertaining to or based on observation and management of Pts, in contrast to theoretical or basic sciences.

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl)
1. Relating to the bedside of a patient.
2. Denoting the symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from the laboratory findings or anatomic changes.
3. Relating to a clinic.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

clinical

1. Concerned with the immediate observation, examination and treatment of patients.
2. Relating to a CLINIC.

clinical,

adj 1. relating to the examination and healing of patients.
2. relating to people in a clinic.
clinical aromatherapist (kliˑ·ni·kl ·rōˈ·m·theˑ·r·pist),
n a person who is trained and professionally certified in the use of essential oils for therapeutic purposes.
clinical auditing,
n large-scale measurement and evaluation of patients using questionnaires to gather information on the outcomes of treatments.
clinical ecology (kliˑ·ni·kl i·kˑ·l·jē),
n study of the toxicity levels present in the environment and in foods along with the impact these levels have on human health.
clinical experimental evidence,
n the results obtained from randomized, blind testing on humans. Also called
RCT evidence. See also randomization and blind testing.
clinical nutrition,
n the use of diet and supplements as a therapeutic and preventive approach.
clinical pattern,
n the association of signs and symptoms presented in a visit to a healthcare professional.
clincal picture,
n a sketch of symptoms and all facets of the patient's ailment that encompasses the specific, general, and mental features. See also symptom picture, drug picture, disease picture, and clinical.
clinical research,
n research involving human subjects in a context in which the researcher interacts directly with the subjects.
clinical significance,
n a level of efficacy that is considered sufficient to adopt the practice.
clinical trial,
n a clinical study.

clin·i·cal

(klin'i-kăl)
Denoting symptoms and course of a disease, as distinguished from laboratory findings of anatomic changes.
[G. klinē, bed, + -al]

clinical,

adj pertaining to a clinic, direct patient care, or materials used in the direct care of patients.
clinical attachment level (CAL),
n a measurement to determine periodontal health; consists of the distance in millimeters that exists between the edge of the enamel of a tooth to the gingival tissue that is adherent to its root, its epithelial attachment.
clinical crown,
clinical crown:clinical root ratio,
clinical death,
n a defined time at which bodily functions have ceased and are unable to be revived. In many instances, the definition of clinical death applies to circumstances where brain activity ceases despite the continuance of body functions.
clinical diagnosis,
clinical medicine,
n the aspect of medicine that deals with direct patient care.
clinical protocol,
n the detailed outline of the steps to be followed in the treatment of a patient.
clinical trials,
n organized studies to provide large bodies of clinical data for statistically valid evaluation of treatment.

clinical

1. pertaining to a clinic or to the bedside and therefore carried out on the living animal.
2. pertaining to or founded on actual observation and treatment of patients, as distinguished from theoretical or experimental.
3. productive of clinical signs; thus clinical disease as distinct from subclinical.

clinical data storage
storage of clinical data about patients; may be paper or computerized.
clinical decision analysis
the application of clinical, epidemiological and other data to influence outome probability and alternative decisions in such areas as surgery and pharmaceutical treatment.
clinical epidemiologist
an epidemiologist who sees patients and herds in a clinical capacity but with an epidemiological viewpoint. An investigator of clinical problems affecting populations.
clinical epidemiology
the application by a veterinarian who provides direct patient care of epidemiological methods to the study of diagnosis and therapeutics in order to promote efficiency in clinical care.
clinical examination
an examination of a patient including taking the history, physical examination by palpation, auscultation and percussion, clinicopathological examination and examination of the environment.
clinical judgment
exerted while the patient is still alive; the critical decisions made on the basis of scientific observations but with the added skill provided by long experience of similar cases. To this must be added an innate ability to make balanced judgments based not only on the state of the animal and its predictable future but also on some consideration for the patient's overall well-being and the client's financial status and degree of psychological, or in some cases actual, dependence on the patient.
clinical nomenclature
a catalog of the names given to diseases and problems of animals; usually alphabetical, may be numerical. Should contain keywords (including key diagnoses and key signs) and synonyms with each list related to the other. Because of the need to sort banks of clinical data into categories it is essential that recording be accurate and that the catalog be limited—a policy of limited vocabulary.
clinical pathologist
a veterinarian skilled in clinical pathology.
clinical pathology
the examination of diseased tissues, fluids or other materials from a living patient, using all of the techniques available including chemistry, hematology, enzymology, cytology, microbiology, parasitology, protozoology, immunology and histopathology.
clinical pharmacology
the study of the actions and metabolism of drugs in living animals.
clinical policies
professional rules of thumb which are used to decide on the management of a case when there are no research results on which to base decisions. They are policies originated by the senior members of the profession, especially those in academic posts.
clinical propedeutics
preliminary training in the clinical sciences; the introduction to veterinary medicine, surgery and animal reproduction.
clinical qualifiers
adjectives used to qualify diagnoses using terms from within a group of standard variables, e.g. chronic or acute, ovine or bovine, benign or malignant, clinical or latent.
clinical record
the record, made at the time, of clinical examinations, treatments and advice given, complete with dates, names of individuals concerned and drugs or tests used. The record is desirable for the purpose of evaluating the patient's progress, and essential from the legal point of view if arguments should arise about competence or justness of charges made.
clinical signs
the abnormalities of structure or function observed in the patient by the veterinarian or the client. These are customarily graded according to severity, e.g. severe, moderate, mild, and according to speed of onset and progress, e.g. peracute, acute, subacute, chronic, intermittent.
clinical trials
a planned experiment, conducted in the field, designed to test the efficacy of a treatment in herds of animals by comparing the outcome under the test treatment with that observed in a comparable group of animal herds receiving a control treatment.
clinical vocabulary
a catalog of terms approved for use in the description of clinical signs and problems, and for the definition of diagnoses and diseases.

Patient discussion about clinical

Q. Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question? Can acupuncture help reduce the pain in fibromyalgia? Is there any clinical evidence to support to my question?

A. Yes, acupuncture therapy can reduce the fatigue, widespread pain and sleep problems associated with fibromyalgia. If acupuncture can be used in place of pain reliever then its good as the side effect associated with pain relievers are reduced.

Q. I want to know what causes clinical depression? My friend is diagnosed with clinical depression. He is showing signs for the past six months. We found this when he lost interest in music which was his soul before. He lost interest in all other activities including hang out with us. We were wondering what could be the reason for the drastic change in his behavior. Very recently he stopped attending school also. We have tried to contact him but in vain. Then we got to know from his brother that he feels very low and depressed and is diagnosed with clinical depression? I want to know what causes clinical depression?

A. Any neurotransmitters imbalance in the brain can cause the mood to go down. This makes the person depressed. This can happen due to genetic impact. The social or financial difficulty can cause the disturbances in neurotransmitters, which causes depression in a person. Try to know from him whether he has any history of failures which he is hiding within him. Try to know the exact cause of depression. Depression, if left unattended, could develop in to Bipolar Disorder.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BloACoqVs1o&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vBloACoqVs1o_cathy_tells_ppd_postpartum_depression_story?q=post%20partum%20depr&feature=player_embedded

Q. What's the difference between clinical depression that needs treating, and just regularly being depressed? I'm often depressed, and i just wondered what the difference is between just being depressed, and clinical? At what point does depression become depression?

A. It depends on the duration of the episodes, the frequency and severity. Even psychiatrists have trouble to pinpoint it. They often disagree on the “borderly” cases, here is some info on the diagnose of depression:
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/35222/362840.html?d=dmtContent

More discussions about clinical
References in periodicals archive ?
health care is missing a link between the financial managers and clinical health managers of defined patient populations.
To order this report: Myalgia Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2014 http://www.
Ideally, patients or surrogates determine their desired goals and results from clinical care.
A Clinical Proteomics Program should be an identifiable organizational unit formed by a single institution or a consortium of" cooperating institutions.
School counselors themselves may not feel a need to receive clinical supervision.
Critical thinking scenarios differ from these traditional case studies because they are short, and thus do not provide extensive background information about the patient, and they are geared to promoting specific critical thinking skills, such as problem solving, decision making, and ability to consider multiple clinical perspectives.
By design, clinical tax programs involve both these skills--in putting together the clinic each year and in working with the clients each tax season.
The third study by Bergman and Pantell (1986) did not relate to information sources but to the interpretation of information contained in a newly published clinical article on treatment of an infant with high fever.
The AIDS Clinical Trials Group, the largest AIDS-related research consortium in the world, has been at the forefront of the medical advances which have dramatically improved the clinical care, survival and quality of life of HIV-positive people.
The proposed studies should be designed to confirm and refine signatures that have been demonstrated to provide information that is potentially useful clinically and that may be used to aid in making clinical decisions.
Clinical information systems aren't proven to be more efficient.
With today's cost pressures in bringing drugs to market, sponsors want innovative solutions that allow them to begin to integrate their disparate clinical systems in order to streamline their clinical research processes and reduce total cost of bringing a drug to market," said Chris Connor, senior research analyst for clinical development at Health Industry Insights, an IDC Company.

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