cleavage

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cleavage

 [klēv´ij]
1. division into distinct parts.
2. the early successive splitting of a fertilized ovum (zygote) into smaller cells (blastomeres) by mitosis.

cleav·age

(klēv'ij),
1.
See also: cleavage division.
See also: Langer lines, tension lines. Synonym(s): intermammary cleft
2. Series of mitotic cell divisions occurring in the oocyte immediately following its fertilization.
See also: cleavage division.
See also: Langer lines, tension lines. Synonym(s): segmentation (2)
3. Splitting of a complex molecule into two or more simpler molecules.
See also: Langer lines, tension lines. Synonym(s): scission (2)
4. Linear clefts in the skin indicating extrinsic stresses being applied in that area.
See also: Langer lines, tension lines.
5. The tendency of a crystal to break along a preferred direction or plane.

cleavage

/cleav·age/ (klēv´ij)
1. division into distinct parts.
2. the early successive splitting of a zygote into smaller cells (blastomeres) by mitosis.

cleavage

(klē′vĭj)
n.
1. Embryology
a. The series of mitotic cell divisions that produces a blastula from a fertilized ovum. It is the basis of the multicellularity of complex organisms. Also called segmentation.
b. Any single cell division in such a series.
2. Chemistry The splitting of a complex molecule, such as a polysaccharide, into simpler molecules.

cleavage

[klē′vij]
Etymology: AS, cleofan, to split
1 the series of repeated mitotic cell divisions that occur in an ovum immediately after fertilization. It transforms the single-celled zygote into a multicellular embryo capable of growth and differentiation. During cleavage, the embryo remains uniform in size as its cells, or blastomeres, become smaller with each division. Kinds of cleavage include determinate cleavage, equal cleavage, indeterminate cleavage, partial cleavage, total cleavage, and unequal cleavage.
2 the act or process of splitting, primarily a complex molecule into two or more simpler molecules. cleave, v.

cleavage

Embryology
The mitotic divisions of a zygote (fertilised egg) to form a blastomere (cleavage cells).
 
Vox populi
The act of splitting or cleaving.

cleav·age

(klēv'ăj)
1. Series of mitotic cell divisions occurring in the oocyte immediately after its fertilization.
See also: cleavage division
2. Splitting of a complex molecule into two or more simpler molecules.
Synonym(s): scission (2) .
3. Linear clefts in the skin indicating the direction of the fibers in the dermis.
See also: cleavage lines

cleavage

1. The process of splitting, especially the repeated stages of cell division that produce a BLASTULA from an ovum that has been fertilized by a spermatozoon.
2. The breaking down of a complex molecule into smaller parts.
3. The vertical furrow between a woman's breasts visible when low-cut garments are worn.
Cleavageclick for a larger image
Fig. 109 Cleavage . Radial and spiral cleavage.

cleavage

the division of the cytoplasm during nuclear division (see MEIOSIS, MITOSIS following FERTILIZATION of the egg to form the ZYGOTE. Holoblastic cleavage occurs in animals where there is little yolk, and here the entire zygote is involved; meroblastic cleavage occurs where the yolky part of the zygote fails to divide, only part of the zygote undergoing cleavage. BILATERAL CLEAVAGE gives rise to a bilaterally symmetrical arrangement of blastomeres, as opposed to spiral cleavage which gives rise to a spiral arrangement of blastomeres. Bilateral cleavage occurs in chordates, echinoderms and a few smaller groups, indicating their common origins whereas most other invertebrate phyla have spiral cleavage.

cleavage

1. division into distinct parts, e.g. the double helix.
2. the early successive splitting of a fertilized ovum into smaller cells (blastomeres) by mitosis. See also holoblastic, meroblastic.

cleavage site
the places on a strand of DNA where the restriction enzyme cleaves the DNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
A preliminary answer is that some societies have overlapping cleavages, where religion coincides with ethnicity, class, region, or caste, rendering that cleavage an intense one.
This way it prevents wrinkles at the cleavage, caused by breasts being pressed against each other while sleeping.
KELLY BROOK As an actress she has her knockers but when it comes to cleavage, Kelly reigns supreme.
The Sun coined the term after a number of celebrities stepped onto the red carpet sporting rather unnatural cleavage thanks to tight-fitted dresses.
The epitome of sophisticated beauty, she wasn't noted for her cleavage.
In contrast to the lack of protection offered by ACh or choline for the effects of DMAE on cleavage divisions, we found that either agent, introduced 10-15 min before, simultaneously with, or 30-60 min after DMAE, provided protection against the delayed-onset disruption of the later developmental events (Figure 4).
Bra-maker Gossard has unveiled its latest weapon in the continuing battle for Britain's cleavage - the Super Boost Ultrabra.
PAMELA Anderson, Gwyneth Paltrow and Jennifer Lopez are the world's most recognisable females - from their cleavage alone.
But don't despair if you're not a naturally voluptuous DD - according to fashion experts you don't need big boobs to have a fabulous show-stopping cleavage.
And the stunning redhead dazzled when she donned scarlet pedal-pushers and a loose-fitting top that showed off some cleavage.