clean wound

clean wound

A superficial wound produced by uncontaminated sharp objects, either electively–eg, surgical procedure or by accident, being cut by sharp glass or metal–eg, broken glass. Cf Clean-contaminated wound, Dirty wound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Discuss preparation of a clean wound bed and the value of initial and periodic wound debridement to accelerate healing
The KeraPac(TM) is placed externally on a clean wound and removed several days later.
It will be placed externally on a clean wound and removed several days later.
The KeraPac is placed externally on a clean wound and removed several days later.
Once the diagnosis is confirmed to rule out arterial involvement, initial assessment should include inspection for a clean wound bed and signs of infection (cellulitis).
These proteins clean wound debris, stimulate cell migration to the wound site, and help remodel collagen fibers to complete the healing process.
For example, if one is using gauze dressings with normal saline on a clean wound that is proliferating, one has to assume one of two situations: (a) the dressing is being applied inappropriately, usually less frequently than recommended (unfortunately, an almost universally routine practice), or (b) excessive nursing time is involved in changing the dressing as frequently as recommended - a sort of no-win situation.
A study published in the January/February 1994 issue of the Journal of Burn Care & Rehabilitation, the official publication of the American Burn Association, found that collagenase ointment, when used with a topical antibiotic, resulted in a significantly shorter time to achieve a clean wound bed (median 6 versus 12 days; p equal 0.
Enzymes normally unleashed to clean wound sites were deployed in the absence of injury.
To reduce the risk of tetanus you should thoroughly clean wounds and treat them with antiseptic.
NURSES are using natural healing products such as honey and maggot larvae to clean wounds and help fight against hospital superbugs.
London, July 8 (ANI): Staff at a Brit hospital are using natural healing products like honey and maggot larvae to clean wounds, and tackle bacteria like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).