social class

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Related to class structure: class struggle

social class

a grouping of people with similar values, interests, income, education, and occupations.

social class

1. Social standing or position. Synonym: socioeconomic status
2. A group of people with shared culture, privilege, or position.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most sensitive debates over the last 20 years has been whether human intelligence and class structure contribute to crime.
Adjusting mortality assumptions for individuals electing not to move up and for substandard applicants protected by the ratchet rule are important actuarial challenges for this class structure.
Witness the ways in which the deeply flawed book, The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life by Richard J.
Just like the real world, the art world appears to be both a rigid class structure based on privilege and provenance (where you show, where you went to school, who your parents are) and an utterly capricious lottery.
developed over a long period of research into class structure and social mobility in Britain and comparatively .
The real pest of the new millennium will be the "double diamond" class structure, maintains Robert Perrucci, professor of sociology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.
the way in which the class structure has tended to become `invisible' under contemporary conditions.
Because the members met the poor as equals, not as social observers, it was a society without class structure.
But, according to these same standards, Indians were no part of a class structure.
This explanation for their success, repeated in several places and shared by the authors, would appear to be the result of the focus on the individuals and not the political economy of American class structure.
At all levels of the class structure, we are motivated, as Barbara Ehrenreich put it some years ago, by "fear of falling" Accounts of downsizing captured the nation's imagination in the 1990s: the laid-off plant manager who clung to his aging Mercedes, suspenders, and sprawling suburban home, depleting his retirement fund in the process; the divorced engraving company employee clutching the remnants of her middle-class existence but reduced to burying her food in the snow in the yard because she could not afford a new refrigerator; unemployed aerospace workers waging a daily battle not to lose their homes and slip into the scary world of poverty.
Abandoning the class structure as its aspirational system, fashion in this lifetime necessarily admires and assumes diversity, wherein style begins.