citation

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citation

Informatics The record of an article, book, or other report in a bibliographic database that includes summary descriptive information–eg, authors, title, abstract, source and indexing terms. See Report.
References in periodicals archive ?
Combining citational presentation with author integration (Table 7) reveals that citing authors preferred overwhelmingly to position F&J within the sentence grammar (i.
In the examples given by the OED, the sequence is conveniently for my argumentation first used in a citational context (12), a copular predicative construction (13) and as an NP (14), skipping predicative uses in-between.
She has mobilised the citational practices of domestic space to reconfigure local management as the promotion of neighbourliness and solidarity.
Here is a handful of citational examples of personification found in our database:
The citational and provisional nature of the characterization Pancho Villa is underscored when one takes into account the stagings of Entre Villa outside of Mexico.
The circumstances surrounding the authority of a justice and his position uniquely imbue his words with performative power; in the words of Judith Butler: 'it is through the invocation of convention that the speech act of the judge derives its binding power, that binding power is to be found neither in the subject of the judge nor in his will, but in the citational legacy by which a contemporary "act" emerges in the context of a chain of binding conventions'.
While at times they seem forced and distracting, her range of citational devices and sources is impressive, and they always serve to remind the reader--helpfully so--of the labor involved in writing in and from the interstices.
While the arguments that follow should not be understood as a celebration of trials as radically transformative legal spaces, either for the law or for the social subjects that come before it, thinking about their performative enunciations of law does, in my view, open up a way to analyze moments of disruption and foreclosure in the ongoing citational processes that constitute social identity.
Take the work's opening via citational epigraph--"Ya mi talle se ha quebrado / como cana de maiz"--a predictable (by 1951, all too predictable) "modernist" move.
Now you know that I don't write about Antin in Unoriginal Genius: he is certainly NOT a citational poet.
What is of interest is an examination of the epitaph not as a generic tradition unto itself but rather as a citational move within a whole range of English Renaissance contexts.