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citation

Informatics The record of an article, book, or other report in a bibliographic database that includes summary descriptive information–eg, authors, title, abstract, source and indexing terms. See Report.
References in periodicals archive ?
As one who believes that judicial opinions by their nature should be citable, I applaud the committee's development of this proposed Rule.
All research outputs can be made citable, visualisable, embeddable and trackable with one click.
A fourth category comprises cases citable for their "persuasive value.
AMSTERDAM, October 6, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Elsevier, the world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and solutions, announced today the launch of Article-Based Publishing -- a new publishing model that publishes articles as final and citable without needing to wait until a journal issue is complete.
Khawaj Barrister Ali Zafar adopted the stance that there are many glorious and citable examples of other judges who on account of much less ground for pious have gracefully refused themselves from hearing the case when any of the party mentioned of the possible biased before them.
The author or coauthor of 19 reviewed journal articles and 34 other citable publications (conference proceedings), he is credited with 12 invention disclosures and five patent applications.
However, that Court of Appeal decision is no longer citable because of the California Supreme Court's grant of review.
In fact, data collected from the SCImago Journal shows that Arab League countries produced in total 54,151 citable documents in 2013 while Spain produced 72,633 and South Korea reached 67,783 documents.
F1000Research's publishing platform has been especially popular with the bioinformatics community, because the article can be linked to a permanent and citable instance of the relevant software code, and a new version of the article can be published when the software itself is updated.
The JIF is calculated by dividing the number of journal articles cited by other researchers in a given year by the total number of citable articles published in the previous two years.
Malthus's concerns and his conceptual apparatus were of course those of his age, yet as Leacock's bouncing couplets attest, they were still and newly citable in the 1930s; and in several ways, mutatis mutandis, Malthus's concerns remain ours.