circumduction


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Related to circumduction: pronation, circumduction gait

circumduction

 [ser″kum-duk´shun]
circular movement of a limb or of the eye.

cir·cum·duc·tion

(ser'kŭm-dŭk'shŭn), [TA]
1. Movement of a part, for example, an extremity, in a circular direction.
2. Synonym(s): cycloduction
Synonym(s): circumductio [TA]
[circum- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to draw]

circumduction

/cir·cum·duc·tion/ (-duk´shun) circular movement of a limb or of the eye.

circumduction

(sûr′kəm-dŭk′shən)
n.
The circular movement of a limb such that the distal end of the limb delineates an arc.

circumduction

[sur′kəmduk′shən]
Etymology: L, circum + ducere, to lead
1 one of the four basic movements allowed by the various joints of the skeleton. It is a combination of abduction, adduction, extension, and flexion. An example is the motion of a bone whose head articulates with a cavity, such as the femur with the acetabulum. The motion of the bone circumscribes a cone, the apex of which is in the cavity and the base of which is described by the distal end of the bone.
2 the circular movement of a limb or of the eye. Compare angular movement, gliding, rotation.
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Circumduction

cir·cum·duc·tion

(sĭr'kŭm-dŭk'shŭn) [TA]
1. Movement of a part, e.g., an extremity, in a circular direction.
2. Synonym(s): cycloduction. Synonym(s): circumductio [TA] .
[circum- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to draw]

circumduction

The movement of a limb that causes the hand or foot to describe a circle.

circumduction (sirˈ·km·dukˑ·shn),

n cone-shaped movement of a limb that includes flexion, abduction, extension, and adduction.

circumduction

circular movement of a limb or of the eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 3 shows that this patient is having more difficulty with shoulder abduction to 90[degrees] with elbow extended, wrist flexion/extension with elbow extended, and wrist circumduction.
Compensatory gait patterns include increased upper-body lateral sway, ankle plantar flexion of the contralateral foot (vaulting), hip elevation during swing phase (hip hike), or leg circumduction [2].
Patients usually try to compensate for this lack of toe clearance by circumduction of the lower limb [106,108], pelvic tilt on the paretic side [106,109], and trunk lateral flexion toward the nonparetic side [113].
However, walking with a locked knee for the entire gait cycle requires specific gait compensations, including hip hiking, vaulting, and circumduction, to create sufficient toe clearance during swing phase [1-3].