cinnamon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mon),
1. The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii Nees (family Lauraceae), an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic. Synonym(s): Saigon cinnamon
2. The dried inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum zeylanicum. Synonym(s): Ceylon cinnamon, Sri Lanka cinnamon
Synonym(s): cassia bark
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon

[sin′əmən]
Etymology: Gk, kinnamomon
the aromatic inner bark of several species of Cinnamomum, a tree native to the East Indies and China. Saigon cinnamon is commonly used as a carminative, an aromatic stimulant, and a spice. cinnamic, adj.

cinnamon

Herbal medicine
A tree native to the Indian subcontinent, the bark of which contains cinnamanic aldehyde, eugenol and tannins; it is antibacterial, carminative, stimulates the appetite and is used for gastrointestinal complaints.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
The dried bark of Cinnamomum loureirii, an aromatic bark used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon,

n Latin name:
Cinnamomum spp.; parts used: bark, leaves; uses: antifungal, aromatic, analgesic, diarrhea, colds, stomach pain, appetite loss, hypertension, bronchitis, internal bleeding; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; can cause elevated heartbeat, stomatitis, glossitis, gingivitis, anorexia, labored breathing. Also called
Cassia, Cassia lignea, ceylon cinnamon, Chinese cinnamon, cinnamomom, false cinnamon, Panang cinnamon, Padang cassia, Saigon cassia, or
Saigon cinnamon.

cin·na·mon

(sin'ă-mŏn)
Dried aromatic bark of Cinnamomum loureirii used as a spice and, in medicine, as an adjuvant, carminative, and aromatic stomachic.
[L. fr. G. kinnamōmon, cinnamon]

cinnamon

a herbal preparation obtained from the bark of Cinnamomum spp. It is used as an astringent in the treatment of diarrhea and flatulence. Cinnamon oil, sometimes used as a name for Cassia Oil, has similar activity, but contains cinnamaldehyde, which has been associated with hypersensitivity reactions.
References in classic literature ?
Cinnamon Bunn met her and said he would show her around the town.
Meanwhile, mix brown sugar, cinnamon, ginger and salt in small bowl until well blended.
INGREDIENTS: FILLING 3 eating apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 Bramley cooking apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 tsp cinnamon 100g demerara sugar 300g blackberries CRUMBLE TOPPING 175g plain flour 1 tsp cinnamon 140g soft brown sugar 35g porridge oats 180g cold unsalted butter METHOD: Put the quartered apples in a bowl and shuffle them around to mix them up a bit.
INGREDIENTS: FILLING 3 eating apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 Bramley cooking apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 tsp cinnamon 100g demerara sugar 300g blackberries CRUMBLE TOPPING 175g plain flour 1 tsp cinnamon 140g soft brown sugar 35g porridge oats 180g cold unsalted butter INGREDIENTS: FILLING 3 eating apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 Bramley cooking apples, peeled, quartered and cored 2 tsp cinnamon 100g demerara sugar 300g blackberries CRUMBLE TOPPING 175g plain flour 1 tsp cinnamon 140g soft brown sugar 35g porridge oats 180g cold unsalted butter METHOD: Put the quartered apples in a bowl and shuffle them around to mix them up a bit.
At the root of the controversy is the delicious bark scraping we know as cinnamon.
Washington, May 9 ( ANI ): Scientists have found that many kinds of cinnamon, cinnamon-flavored foods, beverages and food supplements in the United States use a form of the spice that contains high levels of a natural substance that may cause liver damage in some sensitive people.
In the cinnamon challenge, the participant is tasked with swallowing a spoonful of ground cinnamon in 60 seconds, without taking a sip of water.
Stuck" is a sensitive book about a 7-year-old girl named Cinnamon who is a lot like many other smart kids except sometimes she gets "stuck.
The doughnut I enjoyed the most was apple and cinnamon flavoured.
Cinnamon is the second most popular spice in the U.
Cinnamon extract lowers blood glucose in hyperglycemic subjects.
Cinnamon helps diminish the blood glucose spike that typically follows a meal, in part by delaying stomach emptying, according to new research from Sweden.