cineradiography


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cineradiography

 [sin″ĕ-ra″de-og´rah-fe]
the making of a motion picture record of successive images appearing on a fluoroscopic screen.

cin·e·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(sin'ĕ-rā'dē-og'ră-fē),
Radiography of an organ in motion, for example, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract.

cineradiography

/cine·ra·di·og·ra·phy/ (-ra″de-og´rah-fe) the making of a motion picture record of successive images appearing on a fluoroscopic screen.

cineradiography

(sĭn′ə-rā′dē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
A diagnostic technique in which a camera is used to record images of internal body structures produced through radiography or fluoroscopy.

cineradiography

[sin′irā′dē·og′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, movement; L, radiere, to shine; Gk, graphein, to record
the filming with a movie camera of the images that appear on a fluorescent screen, especially images of body structures following injection of a nontoxic radiopaque medium. Cineradiography incorporates the techniques of cinematography, fluoroscopy, and radiography as a diagnostic technique. Also called cinefluorography, cineroentgenofluorography. See also cineangiocardiography.

cin·e·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(sinĕ-rā-dē-ogră-fē)
Radiography of an organ in motion, e.g., the heart, the gastrointestinal tract.
Synonym(s): cinefluorography.

cin·e·ra·di·og·ra·phy

, cineroentgenography (sinĕ-rā-dē-ogră-fē, -rentgen-ogră-fē)
Radiography of a moving organ.

cineradiography (sin´irā´dēog´rəfē),

n the making of motion pictures by means of roentgen rays and image intensification. Studies are used for diagnosis and research purposes. Speech patterns can be studied during the process of phonation; the action of the tongue, jaws, and palate can be studied during mastication and deglutition.

cineradiography

the making of a motion picture record of successive images appearing in image intensification fluoroscopy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cineradiography of the pharyngeal stage of deglutition in 250 patients with dysphagia.
The biomechanical engineer, on the other hand, devises an experimental study to understand the observation--for example, high-speed cineradiography (motion picture X-ray) of human volunteer crash testing shows that the lower cervical spine hyperextends in a low-speed rear-impact collision before the head strikes the head restraint,(3) potentially accounting for the injuries seen in low-speed crashes.
An inappropriate use of the biomechanical literature would be to conclude that because the volunteers in the cineradiography study were not significantly injured, the observed injuries in the epidemiological study were not real.