cinchona


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cinchona: Cinchona officinalis, Cinchona succirubra

cinchona

 [sin-ko´nah]
the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine, cinchonine, and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă),
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees (family Rubiaceae), native of South America but cultivated in various tropic regions. The cultivated bark contains 7-10% of total alkaloids; about 70% is quinine. Cinchona contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

/cin·cho·na/ (sin-ko´nah) the dried bark of the stem or root of various South American trees of the genus Cinchona; it is the source of quinine and other alkaloids and was used as an antimalarial.

cinchona

(sĭng-kō′nə, sĭn-chō′-)
n.
1. Any of various evergreen trees and shrubs of the genus Cinchona, native chiefly to the Andes, some species of which are cultivated for their bark, which contains quinine and other alkaloids used chiefly to treat malaria.
2. The dried bark of any of these plants. Also called Jesuit's bark, Peruvian bark.

cin·chon′ic (sĭng-kŏn′ĭk, sĭn-chŏn′-) adj.

cinchona

[singkō′nə, chinchō′nə]
Etymology: countess of Chinchon, Peru
the dried bark of the stem or root of species of Cinchona, containing the alkaloids quinine and quinidine.

cinchona

Herbal medicine
A tree native to South America, the primary source of the alkaloids, quinine and quinidine, which was the first effective antimalarial agent; other alkaloids present in cinchona include cinchonidine and cinchonine.
 
Toxicity
Abdominal pain, deafness, delirium, headache, impaired vision, nausea, psychotic disorder, tinnitus, vomiting and weakness.

Homeopathy
See China.

cin·cho·na

(sin-kō'nă)
The dried bark of the root and stem of various species of Cinchona, a genus of evergreen trees contains more than 20 alkaloids, of which two pairs of isomers are most important: quinine and quinidine, and cinchonidine and cinchonine.
[Cinchona, fr. Countess of Chinch'on]

cinchona

A south American tree, genus Cinchona , from the bark of which quinine is derived.

cinchona (kin·chōˑ·n),

n Peruvian shrub, the bark of which is the source of quinine. Samuel Hahnemann repeatedly dosed himself with cinchona to examine its effects and realized that his symptoms paralleled those of malarial patients. This led to his development of his similia principle: “let likes be cured by likes.” Also called
quinine, china bark, or
china. See also quinine.
References in periodicals archive ?
21] Schripsema J, Ramos-Valdivia A & Verpoorte R (1999) Robustaquinones, novel anthraquinones from elicited Cinchona robusta suspension culture.
These include quinine, an extract of the cinchona tree used to treat malaria and arthritis; turbocuarine from the curare liana vine, given to patients as a muscle relaxant during surgery; and taxol from the yew tree for treating breast and ovarian cancer.
Hundreds of people remained stranded in the Vara Blanca and Cinchona areas, close to the volcano, officials said.
Potier's team was also working on alkaloids from Thuja and Cinchona, and one of their discoveries led Potier to propose a synthetic route for the vinca alkaloids.
Jacob's afterword warns against ascribing too much autonomy to subaltern peoples--or, for that matter, to the European scientists who ventured to see America for themselves (see Neil Safier on Joseph Jussieus's thwarted attempts to send Andean cinchona and cinnamon back to Paris).
It was found that different species produced different effects, until an Englishman named Charles Ledger identified a tree of the genus Cinchona as having the highest concentration of quinine.
It occurs naturally in the bark of Cinchona trees growing in Peru and other parts of South America.
He also makes his own ginger beer - ginger, lemon, sugar, water and champagne yeast - and tonic water from boiled-down cinchona bark with lemongrass and seasonal flavors, clove, cinnamon and cardamom for winter and tangerine peel and juice, lemongrass and cardamom in spring.
28) Cullen addressed the medicinal power of Cinchona bark--also known as Cortex Peruvianus--to cure malaria over the space of some twenty pages and concluded its effect was due to it being a stomach tonic by stating, "I have endeavoured [sic] to explain, in my first outlines of practical medical science, that the bark in this instance acts through its tonic effect on the stomach, and I have found nothing in any writings which could make me doubt the truth of my statements.
Quinine, the cure for malaria, comes from the bark of Cinchona trees.
Field Marshal Haig' The bark of the Cinchona tree' Mallorca' 1965.
He pointed to the examples of cinchona bark, ayahuasca, maca, colored cotton, and others, where he said it had already happened.