ciliary muscle


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cil·i·ar·y mus·cle

[TA]
the intrinsic smooth muscle of the ciliary body of eyeball; it consists of circular fibers [TA] (fibrae circulares [TA]), radial fibers [TA] (fibrae radialis [TA]), meridional fibers [TA] (fibrae meridionales [TA]), and longitudinal fibers [TA] (fibrae longitudinales [TA]); action, in contracting, its diameter is reduced (like a sphincter's), reducing tensile (stretching) forces on lens, allowing the lens to thicken for near vision (accommodation).

ciliary muscle

a semitransparent circular band of smooth muscle fibers attached to the choroid of the eye, the chief agent in glowing lens adjustment of the eye to assume a more spherical shape. It draws the ciliary process centripetally, relaxing the suspensory ligament of the crystalline lens and allowing the lens to become more convex.

cil·i·ar·y mus·cle

(sil'ē-ar-ē mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
The smooth muscle of the ciliary body; it consists of circular fibers (Müller muscle) and radiating fibers (meridional fibers, or Brücke muscle); action, in contracting, its diameter is reduced (like a sphincter), reducing tensile (stretching) forces on lens, allowing it to thicken for near vision (accommodation).
Synonym(s): musculus ciliaris [TA] .

ciliary muscle

any muscle contained within the CILIARY BODY surrounding the lens of the vertebrate eye. Through attachment to the lens they change its shape and bring about ACCOMMODATION (1).

Bowman,

Sir William, English ophthalmologist, anatomist, and physiologist, 1816-1892.
Bowman capsule - the expanded beginning of a nephron. Synonym(s): glomerular capsule
Bowman disk - disk resulting from transverse segmentation of striated muscular fiber treated with weak acids, certain alkaline solutions, or freezing.
Bowman eye knife
Bowman gland
Bowman iris needle
Bowman iris scissors
Bowman lacrimal dilator
Bowman lacrimal probe
Bowman membrane - Synonym(s): anterior limiting layer of cornea
Bowman muscle - Synonym(s): ciliary muscle
Bowman probe - a double-ended probe for the lacrimal duct.
Bowman space - the slitlike space between the visceral and parietal layers of the capsule of the renal corpuscle. Synonym(s): capsular space
Bowman strabismus scissors
Bowman theory - that urine is formed by passive filtration through the glomeruli and secretion by the epithelium of the tubules.

cil·i·ar·y mus·cle

(sil'ē-ar-ē mŭs'ĕl) [TA]
The smooth muscle of the ciliary body; action, in contracting, its diameter is reduced (like a sphincter), reducing tensile (stretching) forces on ocular lens, allowing it to thicken for near vision (accommodation).
Synonym(s): musculus ciliaris [TA] .

ciliary

pertaining to or resembling cilia; used particulary in reference to certain eye structures, such as the ciliary body or muscles.

ciliary adenomas
arise from the non-pigmented inner layer of the ciliary epithelium; cause hyphema or glaucoma.
ciliary body
the thickened part of the vascular tunic of the eye, connecting choroid and iris, made up of the ciliary muscle and the ciliary processes. The processes radiate from the ciliary muscle and give attachments to ligaments supporting the lens of the eye.
ciliary body inflammation
ciliary epithelium
rostral continuation of the pars ciliaris retinae; non-pigmented, non-neural cells.
ciliary flush
dilation of deep conjunctival vessels and episcleral vessels causing perilimbal redness.
ciliary glands
sweat glands which have become arrested in their development, situated at the edge of the eyelids. Called also Moll's glands.
ciliary inflammation
cyclitis.
ciliary injection
peripheral hyperemia of the anterior ciliary vessels which produces a deep red or rose color of the corneal stroma, and must be distinguished from hyperemia of the conjunctival vessels. May spread to the perilimbic corneal tissue. Called also ciliary flush.
ciliary muscle
the smooth (mammals) or striated (birds) muscle that forms the main part of the ciliary body and and functions in accommodation of the eye.
primary ciliary dyskinesia
abnormality of ciliary function leading to diseases of respiratory and reproductive tracts including sinusitis and bronchiectasis. May be associated with cardiac displacement. See also kartagener's syndrome.
ciliary process
folded structures on the posterior aspect of the ciliary body.
Enlarge picture
Anatomy of the ciliary processes. By permission from Guyton R, Hall JE, Textbook of Medical Physiology, Saunders, 2000
ciliary reflex
movements of the pupil in accommodation.
ciliary zonules
continuations of the ciliary processes of the ciliary body connecting it to the lens. They are in close contact with the hyaloid membrane of the vitreous body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as astaxanthin combats eyestrain by reducing inflammation in the ciliary muscle, it appears to have similar anti-inflammatory and antioxidant protective effects on skeletal muscles and even on heart muscle.
Given the observed blood flow improvement measured in the retinal capillary vessels, it is likely that more blood reaches the ciliary body and provides nourishment to the ciliary muscles.
As discussed above, astaxanthin may reduce eyestrain by improving blood flow to the ciliary muscles.
57) By increasing the working distance of the ciliary muscle, achieved by the implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) expansion bands, the amplitude of accommodation was thought to increase.
During ciliary muscle contraction, when a reduction in capsular tension occurs, the anterior optic moves anteriorly and the interoptic separation increases.
Although designed to change optic position or shape within the eye upon contraction of the ciliary muscle, current versions of these lenses have received mixed reviews in the literature.
On accommodation, the ciliary muscle contraction releases tension on the capsular bag allowing the two optics to separate due to the elasticity of the haptics linking the lenses with an increase in effective power.
Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue and is associated with ectopia lentis, flat cornea, increased axial length of globe, hypoplastic iris or hypoplastic ciliary muscles, and various skeletal abnormalities.
Second, the ciliary muscles don't squeeze the lens.
The refractive surface of the IOL itself changes shape in response to movement of the ciliary muscles, the natural process of accommodation in the human eye.
Nitric oxide is believed to play a role in controlling IOP through specific mechanisms, including relaxation of the ciliary muscles and other structures which allow fluid to drain from the eye.
There is experimental evidence that nitric oxide may play a role in controlling IOP through specific mechanisms, including relaxation of the ciliary muscles and other structures which allow fluid to drain from the eye.