cigarette


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cigarette

Tobacco A cylinder of cut blonde or black tobacco ensheathed in a tube of usually white paper, often with a filter to ↓ inhaled tars, which is lighted and inhaled at the lips to achieve a pleasurable level of nicotine. See Clove cigarette, Fetal tobacco syndrome, Fire-safe cigarette, Low-tar cigarette, Passive smoking, Safe cigarette, Smokeless cigarette, smoking, Tobacco.
References in classic literature ?
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion.
There was no answer, and he puffed his cigarette, swung his legs, and drummed on the table with rather dirty fingers.
Then with an expression of interest he laid down his cigarette, and carrying the cane to the window, he looked over it again with a convex lens.
Yet I thought we might at least have dined together, and in my heart I felt just the least bit hurt, until it occurred to me as I drove to count the notes in my cigarette case.
He sighed, and I saw his delicate fingers forsake the cigarette they were rolling to make the sacred sign upon his breast.
Philip threw away the cigarette he had just lighted, and flung his arms round her.
A cigarette glowed amid the tangle of white hair, and the air of the room was fetid with stale tobacco smoke.
I ring for coffee, cigarette, and cherry brandy, and take my chair by the window, just as the absurd little nursery governess comes tripping into the street.
Smith-Oldwick lighted his cigarette and sat puffing slowly upon it.
Captain Francis lit a cigarette and smoked thoughtfully for a moment or two.
Granet remarked, lighting a cigarette for himself with some difficulty.
He took a cigarette from the box, curtly inviting Aynesworth to do the same.