chymotrypsin


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chymotrypsin

 [ki″mo-trip´sin]
1. an enzyme with action similar to that of trypsin, produced in the intestine by activation of chymotrypsinogen.
2. a preparation crystallized from an extract of the pancreas of the ox, used clinically for enzymatic dissolution of the zonular membrane of the eye.

chy·mo·tryp·sin

(kī'mō-trip'sin),
Chymotrypsin A, B, or C; a serine proteinase of the gastrointestinal tract that preferentially cleaves carboxyl links of hydrophobic amino acids, particularly at tyrosyl, tryptophanyl, phenylalanyl, and leucyl residues; synthesized in the pancreas as chymotrypsinogen, and subsequently converted to π-, δ-, and finally α-chymotrypsin by successive trypsin-dependent cleavages; proposed for use in the treatment of inflammation and edema associated with trauma and to facilitate intracapsular cataract extraction; chymotrypsin A has the specificity described above, chymotrypsin B is homologous to chymotrypsin A, and chymotrypsin C has a broader specificity (for example, it acts additionally on carboxyl links of methionyl, glutaminyl, and asparaginyl residues).

chymotrypsin

/chy·mo·tryp·sin/ (ki″mo-trip´sin) an endopeptidase with action similar to that of trypsin, produced in the intestine by activation of chymotrypsinogen by trypsin; a product crystallized from an extract of the pancreas of the ox is used clinically for enzymatic zonulolysis and debridement.

chymotrypsin

(kī′mə-trĭp′sĭn)
n.
A pancreatic digestive enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of certain proteins in the small intestine into polypeptides and amino acids.

chy′mo·tryp′tic (-tĭk) adj.

chymotrypsin

[kī′mōtrip′sin]
Etymology: Gk, chymos + tryein, to rub, pepsin, digestion
1 a proteolytic enzyme produced by the pancreas that catalyzes the hydrolysis of casein and gelatin.
2 a yellow crystalline powder prepared from an extract of ox pancreas that is used in treating digestive disorders in which the enzyme is present in less than normal amounts or is totally lacking.

chymotrypsin

Physiology A GI tract serine protease synthesized in the pancreas as a prohormone, which cleaves proteins at hydrophobic amino acids–leucine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine

chy·mo·tryp·sin

(kī'mō-trip'sin)
A serine proteinase of the gastrointestinal tract, synthesized in the pancreas as chymotrypsinogen; used in the treatment of inflammation and edema associated with trauma and to facilitate intracapsular cataract extraction.

chymotrypsin

An ENZYME that breaks down (digests) protein to amino acids and simpler substances. It is secreted by the pancreas and released into the DUODENUM. The enzyme is also used to clean wounds and in an earlier form of cataract surgery to cut the suspensory ligament (zonules) of the cataractous lens.

chymotrypsin

an enzyme found in the pancreatic juice of mammals that functions as an endopeptidase, catalysing the hydrolysis of PEPTIDE BONDS. It attacks the carboxyl groups of specific amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, leucine, tryptophan, and methionine) and so produces large peptides. The enzyme works in the alkaline medium of the small intestine and is secreted by the pancreas in an inactive form.

chymotrypsin

an endopeptidase with action similar to that of trypsin, produced in the intestine by activation of chymotrypsinogen from the exocrine pancreas; a product crystallized from an extract of the pancreas of the ox has been used clinically as an anti-inflammatory agent and for enzymatic zonulolysis and débridement.

chymotrypsin test
a test of pancreatic exocrine efficiency depending on the presence of chymotrypsin to split a peptide-para-aminobenzoic acid compound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dietary Supplements ENZYME DIGESTIVE SYSTEMIC CARBOHYDRASES [alpha]-Amylase X Glucoamylase X (aka amyloglucosidse) Diastase X Invertase X Lactase X [alpha]-Galactosidase X Cellulase X Hemicellulase X Pectinase X [beta]-Glucanase X Xylanase X PROTEASES Bromelain X X Papain X X Protease X X Peptidase X X Chymotrypsin X X Trypsin X X Pepsin X X LIPASES Lipase X Pancreatin X Pancrelipase X OTHER ENZYMES Catalase X X Lactoferrin X Lactoperoxidase X Lysozyme X Super Oxide X X Dismutase (SOD) COMMON ACTIVITY ENZYME COMMON SOURCE ORGANISMS UNITS CARBOHYDRASES [alpha]-Amylase Aspergillus oryzae, A.
The chief difference between trypsin and chymotrypsin seems to be in their specificity.
2%) were unaffected by chymotrypsin at a sufficient concentration of 2 u/m1 (-62.
Chymotrypsin and elastase-1 remain relatively stable during transit through the gastrointestinal tract.
Toxins and other bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria in Lake Ladoga (T, toxic effect; PI, protease inhibitor; ChTI, chymotrypsin inhibitor) m/z [M + H] Toxin Effect References 609 Microcin SF608 PI Banker & Carmeli (1999) 851 Anabaenopeptin F PI Banker & Carmeli (1999) 858 Oscillamide Y PI Sano & Kaya (1995) 915 Nodulapeptin B PI Fujii et al.
Lipase is responsible for digestion of fats, trypsin and chymotrypsin are responsible for proteins, and amylase is active in carbohydrate digestion.
Miklos Sahin-Toth, MD, PhD, of Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine and German researchers have identified chymotrypsin C (CTRC), the gene that encodes trypsin-degrading enzyme, as a susceptibility gene for the disease.
Why bluefin tuna have warm tummies: temperature effect on trypsin and chymotrypsin.
Experimental studies have shown that alcohol consumption leads to an increased amount of digestive (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and lipase) and lysosomal (cathepsin B) enzymes and concurrently increases lysosome and zymogen granule fragility.
Fallon's invention employs the use of digestive and pancreatic enzymes for children with these conditions based upon the presence of a low level of chymotrypsin in the stool.
According to UpFront, its EBA products are adept at separating such wide-ranging substances as: bulk proteins from potato juice, lysozyme from egg whites, albumin from serums, and trypsin and chymotrypsin from porcine pancreases.
A modified spectrophotometric determination of chymotrypsin, trypsin and thrombin.