chylothorax


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chylothorax

 [ki″lo-thor´aks]
a pleural effusion consisting of chyle or a chylelike fluid; it may be either congenital (such as in babies) or acquired from trauma or disease states. There are two types: chylous effusion, due to leakage of chyle from the thoracic duct, and chyliform or pseudochylous effusion, consisting of chylelike fluid, the result of a chronic disease such as tuberculosis.

chy·lo·tho·rax

(kī'lō-thōr'aks),
An accumulation of chylous fluid in the pleural space.

chylothorax

/chy·lo·tho·rax/ (-thor´aks) pleural effusion of chyle or chylelike fluid.

chylothorax

[kī′lōthôr′aks]
Etymology: Gk, chylos + thorax, chest
a condition marked by the effusion of chyle from the thoracic duct into the pleural space. The cause is usually a traumatic injury to the neck or a tumor that invades the thoracic duct. Treatment is directed at repairing damage to the duct.

chylothorax

An uncommon and potentially life-threatening condition due to disruption of the flow of lymph into the thoracic duct, which is caused by penetrating or blunt trauma to the neck, chest or upper abdomen, or surgery involving the oesophagus, lung, pleura, mediastinum and heart, as well as other conditions (e.g., lymphangioleiomyomatosis or lymphoma).

Clinical findings
Pleural effusion and nutritional deterioration due to major loss of electrolytes, proteins, lipids and vitamins, often accompanied by immune deficiency and lymphopenia.

chy·lo·tho·rax

(kī'lō-thōr'aks)
An accumulation of milky chylous fluid in the pleural space, usually on the left.

chylothorax

A rare condition of accumulation of CHYLE in the space between the lung coverings (pleural cavity). The chyle escapes from the thoracic duct, usually as a result of injury.

chylothorax

the presence of effused chyle in the pleural cavity. Occurs most commonly in dogs and cats, caused by traumatic injury to the thoracic duct, neoplasms in the cranial mediastinum, or a congenital abnormality of the duct.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiographic findings may include massive chylothorax, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, splenomegaly, and translucent bone lesions.
Chylothorax is a collection of lymphatic fluid in the pleural or mediastinal space.
Complete remission of a lymphoma-associated chylothorax by radiotherapy of the celiac trunk and thoracic duct.
19, 20) Although most esophagectomy series in the literature are reported from expert academic centers, recent studies indicate that the vast majority of these procedures (80%) are actually performed in smaller community hospitals, and are complicated by operative mortality of nearly 20%, and, in almost half of these patients, major morbidity including anastomotic stricture (13%), anastomotic leak (7%), dumping syndrome (4%), recurrent aspiration (3%), and wound infection, colon necrosis, pyloric channel ulcer, pulmonary embolus and chylothorax (1% each).
sup][44] In addition, laceration of the thoracic duct can also result in chronic chylothorax even after the removal of the central venous line.
12] However in presence of suitable clinical situation like recurrent pneumothorax, chylothorax or known tuberous sclerosis HRCT is usually enough to clinch the diagnosis.
Only a few post-traumatic or postsurgical cervical chylomas without associated chylothorax have been reported in the literature, and they were all left-sided.
Abstract: Chylothorax occurs when a disruption in the thoracic duct allows chyle to escape into the pleural space.
Postoperative complications included: Respiratory failure (six cases), chylothorax (four cases), atelectasis (two cases), pneumonitis (three cases), acute respiratory distress syndrome (one case), vocal cord palsy (one case) and sepsis (one case).
Some reported complications include injury to the spleen, azygos vein laceration, chylothorax, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, anastomotic leaks, cardiac abnormalities, pleural injury, and tears to the posterior tracheal wall.
The placement of these catheters has been associated with various complications including pneumothorax, hemothorax, hydrothorax, chylothorax, arrhythmias, cardiac tamponade, hematoma formation, air embolism, infection, injury to the great vessels, thrombosis, injury to the brachial plexus, injury to the phrenic nerve, and death.