chylothorax


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chylothorax

 [ki″lo-thor´aks]
a pleural effusion consisting of chyle or a chylelike fluid; it may be either congenital (such as in babies) or acquired from trauma or disease states. There are two types: chylous effusion, due to leakage of chyle from the thoracic duct, and chyliform or pseudochylous effusion, consisting of chylelike fluid, the result of a chronic disease such as tuberculosis.

chy·lo·tho·rax

(kī'lō-thōr'aks),
An accumulation of chylous fluid in the pleural space.

chylothorax

/chy·lo·tho·rax/ (-thor´aks) pleural effusion of chyle or chylelike fluid.

chylothorax

[kī′lōthôr′aks]
Etymology: Gk, chylos + thorax, chest
a condition marked by the effusion of chyle from the thoracic duct into the pleural space. The cause is usually a traumatic injury to the neck or a tumor that invades the thoracic duct. Treatment is directed at repairing damage to the duct.

chylothorax

An uncommon and potentially life-threatening condition due to disruption of the flow of lymph into the thoracic duct, which is caused by penetrating or blunt trauma to the neck, chest or upper abdomen, or surgery involving the oesophagus, lung, pleura, mediastinum and heart, as well as other conditions (e.g., lymphangioleiomyomatosis or lymphoma).

Clinical findings
Pleural effusion and nutritional deterioration due to major loss of electrolytes, proteins, lipids and vitamins, often accompanied by immune deficiency and lymphopenia.

chy·lo·tho·rax

(kī'lō-thōr'aks)
An accumulation of milky chylous fluid in the pleural space, usually on the left.

chylothorax

A rare condition of accumulation of CHYLE in the space between the lung coverings (pleural cavity). The chyle escapes from the thoracic duct, usually as a result of injury.

chylothorax

the presence of effused chyle in the pleural cavity. Occurs most commonly in dogs and cats, caused by traumatic injury to the thoracic duct, neoplasms in the cranial mediastinum, or a congenital abnormality of the duct.
References in periodicals archive ?
2006 Sustained R thoracotomy (Ductus L bilateral chy thorasicus lig+Open chylothorax lung biopsy) succesful, R chylothorax no response 31.
Only a few post-traumatic or postsurgical cervical chylomas without associated chylothorax have been reported in the literature, and they were all left-sided.
Leydig cell tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia), unresolved issues regarding its declining fertility, occurrence of sporadic seizures, and chylothorax.
The clinical presentation includes progressive breathlessness often accompanied by recurrent pneumothoraces and chylothorax.
Cytologic examination of the thoracentesis fluid revealed a mixture of numerous mature lymphocytes and blood consistent with a chylothorax with hemorrhage.
The term chylothorax is used to describe this fluid because the fluid resembles the appearance of chyle, which is the milky fluid taken up by the lacteals from the intestines during digestion.
A wide variety of fetal abnormalities have been addressed via operative fetoscopy, including Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS) or other fetal conditions associated with multiple gestation, fetal chylothorax and obstruction of the fetal urinary tract.
We report a case of a 42-year-old man who presented at our institution with chylothorax after posterior mediastinal mass resection.
For example, the F344/N rat typically used by the NTP has high background incidences of testicular Leydig cell tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia, along with unresolved issues about declining fertility, sporadic seizures, and chylothorax (accumulation of lymphatic fluid in the pleural cavity, which can result from lymphoma).
Some reported complications include injury to the spleen, azygos vein laceration, chylothorax, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, anastomotic leaks, cardiac abnormalities, pleural injury, and tears to the posterior tracheal wall.
19, 20) Although most esophagectomy series in the literature are reported from expert academic centers, recent studies indicate that the vast majority of these procedures (80%) are actually performed in smaller community hospitals, and are complicated by operative mortality of nearly 20%, and, in almost half of these patients, major morbidity including anastomotic stricture (13%), anastomotic leak (7%), dumping syndrome (4%), recurrent aspiration (3%), and wound infection, colon necrosis, pyloric channel ulcer, pulmonary embolus and chylothorax (1% each).
Researchers concluded, "PVI may have significant value in the diagnosis and treatment of processes that produce increased intrathoracic pressure, such as pneumothorax, chylothorax, and in this case pulmonary effusion.