chronotropic response

chronotropic response

A change of heart rate over time in response to stimuli—e.g., exercise, manual labour, sexual activity.

chronotropic response

Cardiac pacing Change of heart rate over time in response to stimuli–eg, exercise
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1] Chronotropic competence is defined by the Model of the Cardiac Chronotropic Response to Exercise.
Body weight and body mass index of these patients were significantly higher than in those with normal chronotropic response (p<0.
Key words: Heart rate variability, heart rate recovery, chronotropic response, autonomic nervous system, exercise test, regression analysis
Myers J, Tan SY, Abella J, Aleti V, Froelicher VF Comparison of the chronotropic response to exercise and heart rate recovery in predicting cardiovascular mortality.
In addition to the fluctuations in heart rate that occur with labour pain, pregnancy attenuates the chronotropic response to adrenaline.
The similarity of hawthorn's effect to that of the [beta]-adrenergic antagonist propranolol was further investigated by determining the effect of both substances on the chronotropic response of cardiomyocytes to epinephrine, a [beta]-adrenergic agonist.
In one study of nearly 10,000 patients, those with normal heart rate recovery; chronotropic response, and a low-risk Duke Treadmill Score had a 0.
Wilkoff, who also serves as the President of the Heart Rhythm Society, and has authored numerous articles on chronotropic response and rate adaptive pacing.
A 4% annual rate of sudden death was seen in the 10% of people with an abnormal heart rate recovery, as well as in the 8% with an abnormal Duke's score, and the 4% with an abnormal chronotropic response to exercise.
Moreover, istaroxime showed a good safety profile: it does not induce chronotropic response, does not prolong QT intervals and demonstrated a good tolerability in safety studies.
During high-intensity exercise training, the patient's blood pressure and chronotropic responses (means, 112/62 to 147/58 mm Hg and 79 to 141 beats/min, respectively) were within safe ranges and likely blunted by beta-blocking medications.
Resting metabolism and HR are measured for 6 minutes with the subject in the seated position, for controlling metabolic and chronotropic responses to the upright position, and after 6 minutes of BWS standing.