chronologic


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chronologic

[kron′əloj′ik]
Etymology: Gk, chronos + logos, reason
1 arranged in time sequence.
2 pertaining to chronology. Also chronological.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their heart rate in the stressor situation shot up on average by 17 bpm less than the children whose cellular age as measured by DNA methylation matched their chronologic age.
Chronologic age and skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist: is there a relationship?
If you look at your patients right, it'll give you an idea of their cardiovascular health independent of their chronologic age.
There should be a dialectic rather than unilinear relationship between these terms because this structure combines Propp's chronologic and Levi-Strauss' logic elements in the narrative.
Our chronologic age can say we are 45 or 65 or 75, but it's our physiologic age that tells how "old" we really are.
This is compounded by the fact that inmates often lack adequate health care before incarceration, which can mean their physiologic age is 10 to 15 years older than their chronologic age.
Radiographic study of the development of permanent dentition of Brazilian children with chronologic age a of 84 and 131 months.
Many of these offenders age 55 and older have physiologic ages that are at least 10 years older than their chronologic ages, which has placed tremendous pressure on correctional health care budgets.
A chronologic typology depends on a sequence of safely datable specimens to which others can be compared, and such a corpus proved impossible to establish due to the problematic nature of the source material.
Portrait proceeds in chronologic order with an emphasis on Eakins' youth, notably his rigorous art studies in France and Spain for four years beginning in 1866.
The first chapter provides a chronologic history of recorded information and the corresponding technological advances.