chronic stable angina

chronic stable angina

The most common form of angina, which is characterised by discomfort in the chest region due to myocardial necrosis. The pain reported has been linked to substances released during transient ischaemia—e.g., adenosine, histamine, bradykinin, serotonin—as well as acidosis and increased K+.

chronic stable angina

Cardiology The most common form of angina, characterized by chest discomfort due to myocardial ischemia, and unaccompanied by myocardial necrosis; the cause of pain is uncertain, possibly substances released during transient ischemia–eg, adenosine, histamine, bradykinin, serotonin, as well as acidosis, ↑ K+
References in periodicals archive ?
Impact of angina frequency on health utility values of patients with chronic stable angina.
Chronic stable angina is characterized by chest pain during exertion caused by a narrowing of the coronary arteries.
In chronic stable angina catheter based intervention has led to better symptom control along with decrease in the need of CABG.
It's now clear that percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) relieves symptoms but doesn't save lives or prevent heart attacks in people with chronic stable angina.
It substantially reduces quality of life, with one in three patients with chronic stable angina having an angina "attack" at least once a week.
Prognostic implications of results from exercise testing in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris treated with metoprolol or verapamil.
We have reported on the direct relationship between serum PAPP-A concentrations and both the extent and complex morphology of angiographic coronary artery stenoses in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris (4,5).
It is prescribed that anyone with chronic stable angina keep nitroglycerin tablets or spray with them at all times.
Ranolazine has established safety and efficacy as treatment for chronic stable angina, but this is the first time the therapy is being studied specifically in a post-PCI setting as part of a randomized clinical trial," said Norbert W.
Procoralan is already indicated in the symptomatic treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris in coronary artery disease adults with normal sinus rhythm unable to tolerate or with a contra-indication to the use of beta-blockers or in combination with beta-blockers in patients inadequately controlled with an optimal beta-blocker dose and whose heart rate is > 60 bpm.
A second measure calls on physicians to refer all patients who've had an acute MI, coronary artery bypass graft surgery percutaneous coronary intervention, cardiac valve surgery or cardiac transplantation, or who have chronic stable angina to a rehabilitation or secondary prevention program.
We would like to offer some perspective and questions to ask ourselves when caring for patients with chronic stable angina.

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