chronic sorrow

chronic sorrow

A cyclical, recurring, and potentially progressive pattern of pervasive sadness that is experienced by a parent or caregiver, or individual with chronic illness or disability in response to continual loss, throughout the trajectory of an illness or disability.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the presence and meaning of chronic sorrow in a group of next of kin of patients with MS.
The definition of what is considered to be an illness, how patients are defined and treated, the focus of care, the site of care, the outcomes of care, usable concepts such as grief, chronic sorrow, bereavement--all of these ideas have a history as to how and why they developed, were accepted--or were rejected.
The understanding of parenting gained from the study included parent's chronic sorrow, stress and burden, normalization, stigma, secrecy, and disclosure.
Some themes related to parenting in the literature, and evident in this study, were chronic sorrow, stress and burden, normalization, stigma, secrecy, and disclosure.
Abstract: The goals of this study were to describe the ways in which patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) manage chronic sorrow and to apply this information to the theoretical model of chronic sorrow.
Chronic sorrow revisited: Parent versus professional depiction of the adjustment of mentally retarded children.
There is a potential for such psychosocial consequences as parental chronic sorrow and alterations in coping.
However, at the same time, the experience can be one of pain - a spark that ignites the flames of chronic sorrow.
The fact that the rate of occurrence of chronic sorrow was 80% for patients living with MS (Hainsworth, 1994) demonstrates a need to more widely acknowledge this aspect of psychological reaction.
In this widely quoted paper, Olshansky observed that parents of children with mental retardation have a perpetual reaction of chronic sorrow to the "tragic fate" of their child, a reaction that ends only with their deaths or the child's death.
Later, even though they may appear to function well, there is evidence that families often suffer a chronic sorrow, characterized by peaks and valleys of adjustment, as they care for their children over the years (Wikler, Wasow, & Hatfield, 1983).
This is called chronic sorrow (Burke, Hainsworth, Eakes, & Lindgren, 1992; Eakes, Burke, & Hainsworth, 1998; Lindgren, Burke, Hainsworth, & Eakes, 1992).

Full browser ?