chronic rejection


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Related to chronic rejection: Acute Rejection

chron·ic re·jec·tion

a transplant rejection occurring gradually, sometimes months later.

chronic rejection

immune rejection of transplanted tissue that may continue for several months.

rejection

Immunology An immune reaction evoked by allografted organs; the prototypic rejection occurs in renal transplantation, which is subdivided into three clinicopathologic stages. See Cyclosporin A, Graft rejection, Graft-versus-host disease, Second set rejection, Tacrolimus, Transplant rejection.
Rejection types  
Hyperacute rejection Onset within minutes of anastomosis of blood supply, which is caused by circulating immune complexes; the kidneys are soft, cyanotic with stasis of blood in the glomerular capillaries, segmental thrombosis, necrosis, fibrin thrombi in glomerular tufts, interstitial hemorrhage, leukocytosis and sludging of PMNs and platelets, erythrocyte stasis, mesangial cell swelling, deposition of IgG, IgM, C3 in arterial walls
Acute rejection Onset 2-60 days after transplantation, with interstitial vascular endothelial cell swelling, interstitial accumulation of lymphocytes, plasma cells, immunoblasts, macrophages, neutrophils; tubular separation with edema/necrosis of tubular epithelium; swelling and vacuolization of the endothelial cells, vascular edema, bleeding and inflammation, renal tubular necrosis, sclerosed glomeruli, tubular 'thyroidization' Clinical ↓ Creatinine clearance, malaise, fever, HTN, oliguria
Chronic rejection Onset is late–often more than 60 days after transplantation, and frequently accompanied by acute changes superimposed, increased mesangial cells with myointimal proliferation and crescent formation; mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, and interstitial fibrosis; there is in general a poor response to corticosteroids

chron·ic re·jec·tion

(kronik rē-jekshŭn)
Rejection of surgical transplant occurring gradually, sometimes months later.
References in periodicals archive ?
We now know that chronic reflux can lead to chronic rejection in the lung," Dr.
In addition, stimulation of the immune system from acute rejection is associated with a higher risk of chronic rejection and with poorer long-term graft survival (Kahan & Poniticelli, 2000).
Most lung transplant patients eventually develop chronic rejection, said Dr.
Further, the effects of acute rejection are both immediate and long term, in that the patient with frequent episodes of acute rejection is more likely to experience chronic rejection.
He was taking prednisone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate for chronic rejection.
Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital have devised a new way to decode the immune signals that cause slow, chronic rejection of all transplanted kidneys, Medical News Today reported.
Success was also measured in terms of whether patients developed histologically proven obliterative bronchiolitis or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, both of which flag chronic rejection.
Hennigan received his first heart transplant in 2004, but over time, his body suffered from chronic rejection of his new heart.
In thoracic organ transplantation, chronic rejection continues to be a problem with no ready solution.

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