chronic rejection


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Related to chronic rejection: Acute Rejection

chron·ic re·jec·tion

a transplant rejection occurring gradually, sometimes months later.

chronic rejection

immune rejection of transplanted tissue that may continue for several months.

rejection

Immunology An immune reaction evoked by allografted organs; the prototypic rejection occurs in renal transplantation, which is subdivided into three clinicopathologic stages. See Cyclosporin A, Graft rejection, Graft-versus-host disease, Second set rejection, Tacrolimus, Transplant rejection.
Rejection types  
Hyperacute rejection Onset within minutes of anastomosis of blood supply, which is caused by circulating immune complexes; the kidneys are soft, cyanotic with stasis of blood in the glomerular capillaries, segmental thrombosis, necrosis, fibrin thrombi in glomerular tufts, interstitial hemorrhage, leukocytosis and sludging of PMNs and platelets, erythrocyte stasis, mesangial cell swelling, deposition of IgG, IgM, C3 in arterial walls
Acute rejection Onset 2-60 days after transplantation, with interstitial vascular endothelial cell swelling, interstitial accumulation of lymphocytes, plasma cells, immunoblasts, macrophages, neutrophils; tubular separation with edema/necrosis of tubular epithelium; swelling and vacuolization of the endothelial cells, vascular edema, bleeding and inflammation, renal tubular necrosis, sclerosed glomeruli, tubular 'thyroidization' Clinical ↓ Creatinine clearance, malaise, fever, HTN, oliguria
Chronic rejection Onset is late–often more than 60 days after transplantation, and frequently accompanied by acute changes superimposed, increased mesangial cells with myointimal proliferation and crescent formation; mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, and interstitial fibrosis; there is in general a poor response to corticosteroids

chron·ic re·jec·tion

(kronik rē-jekshŭn)
Rejection of surgical transplant occurring gradually, sometimes months later.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the use of inhaled cyclosporine was associated with a 79% reduced risk of death and a 72% reduced risk of chronic rejection or death, compared with placebo.
Even patients who receive an organ from an identical twin develop chronic rejection.
But both survival and chronic rejection were prespecified as secondary end points for the study.
We also describe the surprising finding of fibrotic lesions of the large bronchi, which is usually restricted to membranous and respiratory bronchioles, in the context of chronic rejection with OB.
At the least, further research and progress in CTA transplant immunology is warranted to address the outstanding issues of chronic rejection and patient safety.
Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the main forms of chronic rejection in heart transplant patients.
Research on chronic rejection in heart and lung transplantation will be a primary focus, including cardiac allograft vasculopathy and reperfusion injury in heart and lung transplantation.
Graft loss in first year occurred due to renal vein thrombosis (n = 1), thrombosis of revised arterial anastomosis (n = 1), arterial thrombosis due to myocardial infarction (n = 1), vasculitis (n = 1), FSGS (n = 1) and chronic rejection (n = 1).
One of these patients had acute and chronic rejection of the kidney, but no rejection of the liver.
Failure to adhere to the prescribed regimen leads to suboptimal immunosuppression, an increased risk of chronic rejection, and thereafter graft loss.
People who receive allogeneic bone marrow or solid organ transplants are at high risk to CMV infection which can lead to severe conditions such as pneumonitis or hepatitis or complications such as acute or chronic rejection of the transplant.
Significant past medical history consisted of a cadaveric renal transplant in 1992, which subsequently underwent chronic rejection requiring transplant nephrectomy 5 years later.
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