chronic pneumonia

chron·ic pneu·mo·ni·a

vague or indefinite usage for long-term inflammation of pulmonary tissue of any etiology.

chron·ic pneu·mo·ni·a

(kronik nū-mōnē-ă)
Indefinite usage for long-term inflammation of pulmonary tissue of any etiology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such erosions and extrusions have also been reported to produce chronic pneumonia, bronchiectasis and bronchopleural fistulas.
In their series of 115 patients with non-resolving and chronic pneumonia, Kirtland et al.
Nick was initially diagnosed with chronic pneumonia in both lungs which meant that he was constantly coughing and choking, but unfortunately, this physical stress meant that he suffered an acute intracerebral haemorrhagic stroke, causing severe permanent sight impairment in both eyes.
Care should be taken to rule out other diseases such as coccidiosis, Nematodiriasis, liver abscesses, chronic pneumonia and chronic peritonitis, so as to ensure the diagnosis is correct.
Tara said: "Our daughter Mia had measles and chronic pneumonia when we were trying to adopt her.
The inquest heard retired carpenter and soldier Mr Nicholls had spent four months in Heartlands Hospital after being admitted with chronic pneumonia in November, 2010.
He had chronic pneumonia and could barely feed himself because his teeth were so bad.
Concurrent administration of Vitamin A may be, therefore essential for clinical recovery from chronic pneumonia (Kahn and Line, 2005).
Depending on the clinical forms of CLD patients were divided into the following manner: patients with chronic pneumonia (CP)--110 patients (with deformation of bronchus without its enlargement--82, with bronchiectasis--28); patients with chronic bronchitis (CB)--84 (obstructive--46 patients, without obstruction--38 patients).
Washington, Dec 16 (ANI): A new research by Canadian and Spanish scientists has found the first immunological clue of why some H1N1 patients develop chronic pneumonia or die.
Biggs, 80, who has chronic pneumonia, was transferred from hospital in Norfolk to his "final home" in Barnet, North London, by private ambulance.
William Bunce, who worked to disestablish Shinto as Japan's state religion during the Allied occupation after World War II, died of chronic pneumonia in Maryland on July 23, the Washington Post reported Thursday.

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