keratoconjunctivitis

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keratoconjunctivitis

 [ker″ah-to-kon-junk″tĭ-vi´tis]
inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.
epidemic keratoconjunctivitis a highly infectious form, commonly with regional lymph node involvement, occurring in epidemics; an adenovirus has been repeatedly isolated from affected patients.
phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis a form marked by formation of a phlyctenule (small lesion) at the corneal limbus.
keratoconjunctivitis sic´ca a condition marked by hyperemia of the conjunctiva, thickening and drying of the corneal epithelium, and itching and burning of the eye. Called also dry eye.

ker·a·to·con·junc·ti·vi·tis

(ker'ă-tō-kon-jŭngk'ti-vī'tis),
Inflammation of the conjunctiva and of the cornea.

keratoconjunctivitis

/ker·a·to·con·junc·ti·vi·tis/ (-kon-junk″tĭ-vi´tis) inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.
epidemic keratoconjunctivitis  a highly infectious form, commonly with regional lymph node involvement, occurring in epidemics; an adenovirus has been repeatedly isolated from affected patients.
phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis  a form marked by formation of a small, gray, circumscribed lesion at the corneal limbus.
keratoconjunctivitis sic´ca  a condition marked by hyperemia of the conjunctiva, thickening and drying of the corneal epithelium, itching and burning of the eye and, often, reduced visual acuity.
viral keratoconjunctivitis  epidemic k.

keratoconjunctivitis

(kĕr′ə-tō-kən-jŭngk′tə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.

keratoconjunctivitis

[ker′ətōkənjungk′tivī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, keras + L, conjunctivus, connecting + Gk, itis, inflammation
inflammation of the cornea and the conjunctiva. Kinds of keratoconjunctivitis include eczematous conjunctivitis, epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

keratoconjunctivitis

Infectious disease Acute inflammation of the anterior eye–cornea and conjunctiva, often accompanied by nasopharyngitis; both are features of the common cold and usually due to viruses. See Common cold.

ker·a·to·con·junc·ti·vi·tis

(ker'ă-tō-kŏn-jŭngk'ti-vī'tis)
Inflammation of the conjunctiva and of the cornea.

keratoconjunctivitis

A severe inflammation of the membrane covering the white of the eye (the CONJUNCTIVA), with involvement of the CORNEA, associated with a disorder of the outer lens (the cornea). This is most commonly caused by an ADENOVIRUS acquired by contact, via towels, fingers or eye drops. A week or two after onset, the cornea may develop a number of small, whitish opacities that may disturb vision. These often last for months, but will eventually disappear. There is no specific treatment. See also KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA.

Keratoconjunctivitis

Inflammation of the conjunctiva and cornea of the eye.
Mentioned in: Hairy Cell Leukemia

keratoconjunctivitis

Inflammation of the conjunctiva and the cornea. See punctate epithelial keratitis; rosacea keratitis.
actinic keratoconjunctivitis Inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva caused by exposure to ultraviolet light as, for example, from sun lamps, welder's arc or reflection from the snow. Both cornea and conjunctiva are usually involved although one tissue may be more affected than the other, hence the terms 'actinic conjunctivitis' or 'actinic keratitis'. Some time after exposure (4-8 hours) to the ultraviolet radiations, the patient experiences a marked sandy feeling in the eye, lacrimation, photophobia, blepharospasm, with congestion of the conjunctiva and swelling of the eyelids. The condition is usually self-limited and heals within 48 hours. Symptoms are relieved with cold compresses, firm patching and an analgesic. A local anaesthetic may sometimes be used, but this delays the regeneration of the corneal epithelium and is not usually recommended. A topical antibiotic may also be used to prevent secondary infection. Sunglasses or suitable protection may prevent the condition. Syn. arc eye; flash blindness; photokeratitis; photokeratoconjunctivitis; photophthalmia; snow blindness (although this is not a strictly correct synonym it is often used as such); sun lamp conjunctivitis; ultraviolet keratitis. See actinic.
atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) A rare but serious inflammation of the conjunctiva and the cornea caused by a reaction of the tissues to an allergen (e.g. pollen, dust mite) in which there is an exaggerated immune response. This hypersensitivity is often associated with a family history of allergic diseases, such as asthma, atopic dermatitis or eczema. Patients are usually young adults. Common signs are redness, lid eczema, small papillae found on the lower and upper tarsal conjunctiva (unlike the large papillae of vernal conjunctivitis which occur only on the upper conjunctiva). Common symptoms are itching, photophobia, a burning sensation and blurred vision if there is keratitis. Treatment includes mast cell stabilizers and antihistamines, and in severe cases corticosteroids.
epidemic keratoconjunctivitis See contagious conjunctivitis.
phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis A condition characterized by the presence of phlyctenules (nodules) on the conjunctiva, limbus or even the cornea. It is a delayed hypersensitivity response to bacterial antigens (e.g. Staphylococcus, aureus, Candida albicans, Chlamydia trachomatis). Symptoms are soreness, lacrimation and if the cornea is involved photophobia. The nodules are pinkish-white on the conjunctiva surrounded by hyperaemia and greyish-white at the limbus and on the cornea. They leave a scar on the cornea (but not on the conjunctiva) when healed. The condition may resolve spontaneously but therapy is with topical corticosteroids. It is often associated with blepharitis or bacterial conjunctivitis. Syn. phlyctenulosis.
keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) A condition affecting the cornea and conjunctiva due to, either a tear deficiency which is divided into two categories: Sjögren syndrome hyposecretive KCS and non-Sjögren syndrome hyposecretive KCS, or to an excessive evaporation of tears (evaporative KCS). KCS linked to Sjögren's syndrome occurs in two forms: primary in which there is KCS with xerostomia (dry mouth) and secondary in which there is KCS with a systemic autoimmune connective tissue disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. KCS without the association with Sjögren's syndrome is most commonly age-related, but some cases may be due to injury to the lacrimal tissue by tumour, inflammation (e.g. trachoma), systemic disease (e.g. cicatricial pemphigoid, sarcoidosis,), systemic medications (e.g. antihistamines, antidepressants), xerophthalmia, photorefractive keratectomy, LASIK or congenital disease (e.g. congenital alacrima, Riley-Day syndrome). Evaporative KCS occurs due to an absence of the oily outer surface of the tear film, often as a result of meibomian gland dysfunction or blepharitis, or to abnormal lid-globe congruity, defective blinking, contact lens wear, air-conditioning environment or wind.Common diagnostic tests are tear film break-up time test, Schirmer's test and rose bengal dye evaluation. Symptoms and signs of the various forms are similar, although they are more severe in patients who have Sjögren's syndrome. Symptoms are burning, foreign body sensation, itching, photophobia and blurred vision (due to corneal involvement). Signs are mucus discharge (plaques and filaments), decreased tear meniscus and conjunctival injection. Management includes artificial tears, corticosteroids, punctal occlusion and in severe cases closure of the lacrimal puncta or tarsorrhaphy. Syn. dry eye; keratitis sicca. See alacrima; impression cytology; dry eye; meibomian glands; immunosuppressants; filamentary keratitis; exposure keratopathy; punctual occlusion; non-invasive break-up time test.
superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis (SLK) Chronic inflammation of the superior cornea and conjunctiva. It is characterized by hyperaemia, hazy epithelium and, often, corneal filaments near the upper limbus and the adjacent conjunctiva, and with the sensations of burning, itching, photophobia and hazy vision. The condition is bilateral in 50% of cases. Detection of the disease in its mild form is difficult, as it requires lifting the upper eyelid. The condition typically affects middle-aged women with thyroid dysfunction. It may be induced by soft contact lens wear. Smaller hard lenses, especially gas permeable, rarely cause this disease. Management involves several options: application of silver nitrate, topical medication (e.g. sodium cromoglicate), thermal cauterization of the superior bulbar conjunctiva, or occlusion of the lacrimal puncta/um to increase tear volume over the conjunctiva. See thyroid ophthalmopathy.
vernal keratoconjunctivitis See vernal conjunctivitis.

keratoconjunctivitis

inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.

chronic immune-mediated keratoconjunctivitis syndrome
see chronic superficial keratitis.
infectious keratoconjunctivitis
see also infectious bovine kerato conjunctivitis. Caused by Moraxella bovis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Chlamydiae, Mycoplasma spp.
proliferative keratoconjunctivitis
see nodular fasciitis.
keratoconjunctivitis sicca
a condition marked by hyperemia of the conjunctiva, thickening and drying of the corneal epithelium, secondary to quantitative and qualitative deficiencies in the tear film. Deep keratitis and corneal ulceration may occur. Often a tenacious, stringy mucoid discharge accumulates in the conjunctival sac. Called also dry eye.
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