chromosome pairing

chro·mo·some pair·ing

(krō'mō-sōm pār'ing),
The process in synapsis whereby homologous chromosomes align opposite each other before disjoining in the formation of the daughter cell; the apposition permits exchange of genetic material in crossing-over.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hybridization and chromosome pairing studies have to some extent revealed the species relationship and the progenitors of some of the polyploidy species have been determined.
Chromosome pairing studies has disclosed the progenitors of C.
There appears to be an association between lack of chromosome pairing and irregular spores and reduced spore germination in these plants.
Barrington (1990) reported that in such situations, chromosome pairing may be under less stringent genetic control in Polystichum than in other fern groups, thus allowing the relatively high frequencies of homologous and homoeologous pairing as observed in Polystichum hybrids.
diversicolor supertexta marker chromosomes, (2) chromosome pairing, (3) the number of chromosomes of each type, and (4) the ratio between the total length of metacentric chromosomes and submetacentric chromosomes.
Researchers examine recent developments in three primary areas: quantitative genetic methods for analysis of homologous recombination and chromosome pairing, development of direct physical assays for DNA intermediates and products of recombination, and cytological techniques for characterizing chromosome behaviors and the patters with which specific proteins associate with meiotic chromosomes.
Hence, chromosome pairing has been shown to be under genetic control and is also influenced by environmental conditions.
Data from chromosome pairing are captured as pair-wise comparisons and are amenable only to phenetic analysis, and hence are not suited for phylogenetic inferences.
The methodology is based on the assumptions that only similar chromosomes pair during meiosis, that similar chromosomes are homologous, and hence, that the extent of chromosome pairing in hybrids reflects the degree of relationship between the parental species (Dewey, 1982: 52).
Genome analysis has been widely applied as a phylogenetic tool, especially in groups of plants that include economically important species, because chromosome pairing data also have potential value in plant breeding.
In the book researchers explore recent developments in three primary areas: quantitative genetic methods for analysis of homologous recombination and chromosome pairing, development of direct physical assays for DNA intermediates and products of recombination, and cytological techniques for characterizing chromosome behaviors and the patters with which specific proteins associate with meiotic chromosomes.
This analysis can show abnormal chromosome pairings such as three copies of chromosome 21, which indicates Down syndrome, or a single copy of the X chromosome which indicates Turner's syndrome.