chromosome pair

chro·mo·some pair

two chromosomes of the full diploid karyotype that are similar in form and function but that usually differ in content, one normally being inherited from each parent and one being transmitted to each progeny; in the heteromorphic sex (in humans, the male), one pair, the sex chromosomes, differ markedly in appearance, content, and function.

chromosome pair

two HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES, one from each parent.
References in periodicals archive ?
This difference is further reflected by the fact that, when two chromosomes of a chromosome pair differ only by carrying different sequences at a single locus, they will be interpreted as two different alleles if they do not characterise a monophyletic group, but as different characters (synapomorphies) if they do.
Each probe is labeled with varying proportions of 3 fluorescent dyes, which allows each chromosome pair to be labeled by a light of unique spectral emission.
For each strain, a single chromosome pair is depicted that is associated with three traits (i.
In a separate report of karyotypic study in two races of this species, only one chromosome pair was identified to have a satellite [5] which is discrepant with our observations.
The chromosome pair was considered as conserved (=) among the three species if arm lengths show no statistical significance.
In this study, FISH signals on one chromosome pair were considerably stronger than those on the other pair (Fig.
During these studies, the scientists noticed that sister kinetochores - the protein structures that mark the site where a chromosome pair is split during cell division - are farther apart in metaphase II eggs from older mice at 16 to 19 months of age compared to eggs from young mice of 6 to 14 weeks of age, a finding that drew their attention to explore reduced cohesion as a primary source for age-related aneuploidy.
Marking was observed in a single metacentric chromosome pair (not individually identified on the karyotypes).